Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Tumor size predicts survival in most common type of lung cancer

11.11.2003


Tumor size can predict the survival of a patient with the most common type of lung cancer, according to physician-scientists at NewYork Weill Cornell Medical Center. The study, which is the lead paper in this month’s Chest, emphasizes the need for further substaging in lung cancer and suggests the importance of early detection by CT scans.



The study evaluates the relationship between tumor size and five-year survival in patients with stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Researchers reviewed the history of 244 patients treated at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center who underwent surgical resection for lung tumors between 1991 and 2001. Overall survival rates and survival rates specific to lung cancer were analyzed and compared to tumor size. The overall five-year survival rate for all patients was 71.1 percent, and the five-year disease-specific survival was 74.9 percent. Significantly, tumor size was an important predictor of long-term survival: disease-specific survival was 81.4 percent for patients with tumors less than or equal to 2.0 cm and only 63.4 percent for patients with tumors greater than 2.0 cm.

"These findings should encourage CT screening, which can detect tumors smaller than one centimeter," says Dr. Nasser K. Altorki, the study’s principal investigator, Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College, and Director of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. "The message is clear: early detection of tumors means better odds of survival."


Further, because the study identifies differences in survival within stage IA, the authors call for further substaging. "We found that a tumor size difference of even one centimeter can impact survival, leading us to believe that further substaging of stage IA lung cancer is necessary to ensure patients in this stage are receiving the most effective treatment," says Dr. Altorki.

Previous studies have noted a sharp difference in survival between patients with nonmetastasized tumors less than 3 cm (stage IA) and tumors more than 3 cm in size (stage IB), but little information has been available on whether size remains an important determinant of survival in tumors less than 3 cm. The study’s authors plan continued investigation of the relationship between NSCLC tumor size and survival. "Further investigation may identify a tumor-size threshold below which there is minimal or reduced risk of tumor metastases," says Dr. Altorki.

In the United States, lung cancer causes more deaths in both men and women than the next three most common cancers combined (colon cancer, 48,100 deaths; breast cancer, 40,000 deaths; and prostate, 30,200 deaths). It has been estimated that 169,400 individuals in the United States received a diagnosis of lung cancer in 2002 (90,200 men and 79,200 women), and 154,900 individuals died from the disease during that year.

The paper is co-authored by Dr. Jeffrey L. Port, Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College and Assistant Attending Cardiothoracic Surgeon at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center; Dr. Michael Kent, Weill Cornell graduate staff; Dr. Robert Korst, Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College and Assistant Attending Cardiothoracic Surgeon at NewYork Weill Cornell; Dr. Daniel Libby, Clinical Professor of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and Attending Physician at NewYork Weill Cornell; and Dr. Mark Pasmantier, Clinical Professor of Medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and Attending Physician at NewYork Weill Cornell.

The NewYork Weill Cornell Medical Center, located in Manhattan on the Upper East Side at York Avenue and 68th Street, comprises NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College.


Office of Public Affairs NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center 525 East 68th Street, Box 144 New York, NY 10021

Jonathan Weil | Cornell News
Further information:
http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/Nov03/tumorsize.html

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>