Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New TB vaccine shows promise in HIV infection

07.11.2003


An innovative vaccine against tuberculosis has shown promise in persons with HIV, researchers from Dartmouth Medical School and the National Public Health Institute of Finland report in the Nov. 7 issue of the journal AIDS.


An international team led by DMS infectious disease expert Dr. C. Fordham von Reyn, professor of medicine, found that the new booster, a killed vaccine, enhanced the TB immunity of HIV patients. Their weakened immune systems make the current TB vaccine, which is a live vaccine, more risky.

In most countries where TB is widespread, children generally receive a vaccine made from live Mycobacterium bovis, Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) that has been used to reduce the risk of TB for more than half century. Despite the widespread use of BCG, TB has been growing dramatically in the world, fueled by the increased susceptibility of HIV-infected people to TB.

TB remains the largest cause of death worldwide from any single infectious disease, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which calls it "the major attributable cause of death" in HIV/AIDS patients.



"Since there is no evidence that the current BCG vaccine protects patients with HIV against TB, we have been working on a new strategy to immunize persons with HIV against TB, safely and effectively," said von Reyn.

In a "back to the future" approach, the investigators revived a strategy used successfully prior to BCG: administration of killed vaccines against TB. The DMS-led team dusted off the concept to employ a multiple dose series of a contemporary killed mycobacterial vaccine to prevent TB in a particularly vulnerable and ever growing group of patients.

The study was done in Finland where BCG vaccine is routinely administered at birth. A cohort of 39 HIV patients, mainly men, were divided into two groups to receive a five-dose course of the killed vaccine, Mycobacterium vaccae, or a control vaccine for Hepatitis B. Parallel studies were also conducted on HIV- negative subjects.

"The multiple-dose course of the inactivated vaccine boosted immunity against TB both in those with HIV and those without TB," von Reyn said. "The vaccine was also safe and did not adversely affect the patients’ underlying HIV infection."

The study served as the basis for a large-scale trial Dartmouth researchers have been conducting since 2001 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania with Muhimbili Hospital Medical Center. The five-year $3 million NIH funded study is the only efficacy trial of a new TB vaccine currently under way in the world. The Tanzania trial will enroll more than 2000 HIV-infected patients to determine if the boosted immunity detected in the Finnish study actually reduces the risk of tuberculosis among HIV infected people in Tanzania at high risk of the disease.


###
First author of the article is Dr. Jenni Vuola of the National Public Health Institute of Finland. Co-authors include Dr. Matti Ristola from Helsinki University Central Hospital, Dr. Bernard Cole, associate professor of community and family medicine at DMS and Susan Tvaroha at DMS. The M. vaccae vaccine is produced by SR Pharma in London.

Andy Nordhoff | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>