Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cervical cancer screening

04.11.2003


No proven benefit of detection of human papillomavirus alone compared with the conventional Pap smear

Under the aegis of the French Society of Clinical Cytology, physicians at the Institut Curie have evaluated the relevance of the papillomavirus detection test, Hybrid Capture‚ II, in screening for cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide. They have shown that this test cannot replace cytological analysis of the cervical smear.
For the first time a learned society, the French Society of Clinical Cytology, has organized a multicenter, national study in general practice. Cervical cancer screening is one of 70 priority measures in France’s Cancer Plan, and an important goal is to establish a test that combines reliability, feasibility and affordability. This work was published in the October 2003 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Pathology.


Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women, with 465 000 new cases and 200 000 deaths worldwide every year. In France, 3 387 new cases and 1 000 deaths were recorded in 2000. Cervical cancer affects women in all age ranges, from 25 years upwards.

Cervical cancer screening: a national priority

Early detection of cervical cancer through intensified screening is one of the 70 measures of the Cancer Plan launched in France by the President of the Republic. Screening is based on the cervical smear test. In this simple and painless test, cells are collected from the surface of the cervix and are examined under the microscope for any anomaly suggestive of lesions that are precancerous or cancerous. It should be performed every three years.

The Cancer Plan is intended to broaden availability of the smear test (family planning, occupational medicine...) to women who do not have a gynecologist, so as to intensify information actions and facilitate testing for papillomavirus infection.
In France, generalization of the smear test has already led to a reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer: the number of cases decreased from 5 992 in 1975 to 3 387 in 2000, i.e. a 46 % decrease in 25 years.

This incidence though is still high, possibly due to the fact that the female population is not fully covered and also because some women develop cervical cancer despite regular smear tests, which clearly have shortcomings (false-negatives, absence of abnormal cells in the area of the smear…). Screening should be improved by the implementation of more sensitive tests.

Comparison of detection of HPV and cytologic analysis

Close to 90% of cervical cancers develop from pre-invasive lesions due to a human papillomavirus (HPV). The efficiency of screening could be improved by the inclusion of testing for HPV.

Under the aegis of the French Society of Clinical Cytology, physicians of the Institut Curie, coordinated by Dr Béatrix Cochand-Priollet (1) have evaluated the efficiency and relevance of the Hybrid Capture‚ II papillomavirus DNA test (HC-II) (2). This test performed on the cervical smear detects papillomavirus DNA and distinguishes high-risk from low-risk HPVs.

By comparing cytologic analyses and the HC-II test in 1 785 patients, the Institut Curie physicians have shown that the HC-II test performed alone is less sensitive than cytologic analysis of a cervical smear.

In conclusion, comparative analysis of the sensitivity and specificity of the HC-II technique and of the conventional Pap smear reveals no advantage of HPV detection alone in the framework of cervical cancer screening.

It is therefore unlikely that the HC-II test will replace cytologic analysis, but it could in certain cases be complementary. Further studies are needed to define the role of the HC-II test in cervical cancer screening and follow-up.


Note

(1) Dr Béatrix Cochand-Priollet works in the Pathological Anatomy and Cytology Department of the Hôpital Lariboisière.
(2) This test is manufactured by Digene“ (Gaithersburg, USA).

Catherine Goupillon | Institut Curie

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht 'Icebreaker' protein opens genome for t cell development, Penn researchers find
21.02.2018 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Similarities found in cancer initiation in kidney, liver, stomach, pancreas
21.02.2018 | Washington University School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signals

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

The “Holy Grail” of peptide chemistry: Making peptide active agents available orally

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>