Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mt. Sinai researchers report that aspirin reduces risk of first heart attack by one-third

23.09.2003


Aspirin reduces the risk of a first heart attack by 32 percent, according to a report by researchers at Mount Sinai Medical Center & Miami Heart Institute (MSMC-MHI) published in the current issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. The paper, which is based on a meta-analysis of five major randomized clinical trials (55,580 participants, 11,466 women) in primary prevention, also found that aspirin reduces the combined risk of heart attack, stroke and vascular death by 15 percent.



Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Co-Director of Cardiovascular Research at MSMC-MHI, and Professor of Medicine & Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Miami School of Medicine was the first to demonstrate the benefit of aspirin in reducing the risk of a first heart attack in a landmark Physicians’ Health Study (PHS), which was published in 1988 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Under his direction, Rachel S. Eidelman, M.D., a cardiology fellow at MSMC-MHI, performed the latest meta-analysis.

The findings strongly support the treatment guidelines issued by the American Heart Association (AHA), which recommends the use of aspirin for all men and women whose 10-year risks of a first coronary event are 10 percent or greater. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released similar guidelines earlier in 2002, urging all healthcare providers to consider the use of aspirin in all apparently healthy men and women with a 6 percent or greater 10-year risk of a coronary event.


"The individual trials and their meta-analysis support the AHA and USPSTF guidelines, which note that the benefits of long-term aspirin use are likely to outweigh any risks for these individuals," Hennekens said. "The more widespread and appropriate use of aspirin in primary prevention could avoid hundreds of thousands of first heart attacks and important vascular events each year in the U.S."

The aspirin component of Dr. Hennekens trial, the PHS, was terminated early on January 25, 1988 based on the unanimous recommendations of the Data and Safety Monitoring Board, due primarily to a statistically extreme 44 percent reduction in risk of a first heart attack among those assigned at random to aspirin. There have been four primary prevention trials published since then, three of which showed similar positive findings for aspirin.

"We found that the current totality of evidence strongly supports our initial findings from the Physicians’ Health Study that aspirin significantly reduces the risk of a first heart attack in apparently healthy individuals," Hennekens added. "This data, along with the findings that aspirin reduces the risk of death by 23 percent if given during a heart attack and by 15 percent in a wide range of people who have survived prior cardiovascular events, demonstrate the need for wider utilization of aspirin."

"Yet despite the clearly demonstrated cardio-protective benefits of aspirin, this medication remains alarmingly underutilized among survivors of prior events, those having a heart attack and apparently healthy men and women, whose 10-year risk is 10 percent or more," Hennekens continued. "We hope the latest findings result in greater awareness on the part of healthcare providers and the general public and motivate increased aspirin utilization, which could result in significant reductions of premature cardiovascular deaths and first heart attacks."

Coronary heart disease is the single leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for more than 500,000 deaths annually. Approximately 80 percent of deaths from coronary heart disease in people under age 65 occur during the first heart attack.



Mount Sinai & Miami Heart’s Cardiovascular Center of Excellence is committed to being a leader in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. The medical center is the largest cardiac services provider in South Florida, conducting approximately 1,300 open heart procedures and approximately 7,400 diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterizations annually.

For a physician referral, please call (305) 674-2273

Katie Cline | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

nachricht Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
20.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tune your radio: galaxies sing while forming stars

21.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Improved Speech Intelligibility and Automatic Speech-to-Text Conversion for Call Centers

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

36 big data research projects

21.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>