Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

How To Eliminate Nitrogen Narcosis Effects

14.07.2003


We do not feel the nitrogen of air, and scientists do not believe that under normal pressure nitrogen can affect human organisms. However, being under water or in the altitude chamber nitrogen produces a different effect. Once the pressure is increased about four times, simulating the pressure which exists at the 30- meter depth, the first signs of intoxication usually show up. They are the same that accompany alcoholic intoxication: unreasonable gaiety, talkativeness, depressed attention, impaired self-control. When the diver descends even deeper, he can easily overlook a danger and experiences difficulty in controlling his movements. Being intoxicated the diver may forget where he is and what he is doing, and may even endanger his life. It has been recognized for almost 70 years that it is nitrogen that causes this effect, and the phenomenon itself has been called nitrogen narcosis. In order to avoid nitrogen effect, physiologists have developed mixtures for breathing at sea depths. In these mixtures relatively inexpensive nitrogen have been replaced by very expensive helium.



Nevertheless, that did not solve all the problems. Nitrogen narcosis effects may even occur with regular dives at depths of 30-40 meters, where helium is not used in the majority of cases. Therefore, it was required to develop a method which would increase the level if resistance to nitrogen narcosis effects. Such method is under way in the Sechenov Institute of Evolutionary Physiology and Biochemistry, St. Petersburg, under the guidance of Alexander Vjotosh. The researchers exposed laboratory rats to higher temperatures or kept them in the air with insufficient oxygen content, and the rats became more resistant to the nitrogen narcosis effects – they managed to pass appropriate tests with better results. After a special training course the resistance increased about one and a half times. If divers were to take this training course, they would be exposed to a lesser risk working underwater. The rats’ resistance to nitrogen narcosis was also one and a half times raised due to quercetin action in cases when they had been injected the substance eight hours before the diving.

The researchers from St. Petersburg have come forward with a new hypothesis explaining the nitrogen action under pressure. The generally adopted point of view is that nitrogen dissolves in cells’ membranes, causing the change of their characteristics, thus violating nerve impulses formation or conduct. The physiologists from the Sechenov Institute have assumed that under the nitrogen increased pressure in the organisms there are formed additional portions of the active compound, which damages cell proteins.

Sergey Komarov | Informnauka
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Custom-tailored strategy against glioblastomas
26.09.2016 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht New leukemia treatment offers hope
23.09.2016 | King Abdullah University of Science and Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New welding process joins dissimilar sheets better

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of light metals.
Scientists at the University of Stuttgart have now developed two new process variants that will considerably expand the areas of application for friction stir welding.
Technologie-Lizenz-Büro (TLB) GmbH supports the University of Stuttgart in patenting and marketing its innovations.

Friction stir welding is a still-young and thus often unfamiliar pressure welding process for joining flat components and semi-finished components made of...

Im Focus: First quantum photonic circuit with electrically driven light source

Optical quantum computers can revolutionize computer technology. A team of researchers led by scientists from Münster University and KIT now succeeded in putting a quantum optical experimental set-up onto a chip. In doing so, they have met one of the requirements for making it possible to use photonic circuits for optical quantum computers.

Optical quantum computers are what people are pinning their hopes on for tomorrow’s computer technology – whether for tap-proof data encryption, ultrafast...

Im Focus: OLED microdisplays in data glasses for improved human-machine interaction

The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP has been developing various applications for OLED microdisplays based on organic semiconductors. By integrating the capabilities of an image sensor directly into the microdisplay, eye movements can be recorded by the smart glasses and utilized for guidance and control functions, as one example. The new design will be debuted at Augmented World Expo Europe (AWE) in Berlin at Booth B25, October 18th – 19th.

“Augmented-reality” and “wearables” have become terms we encounter almost daily. Both can make daily life a little simpler and provide valuable assistance for...

Im Focus: Artificial Intelligence Helps in the Discovery of New Materials

With the help of artificial intelligence, chemists from the University of Basel in Switzerland have computed the characteristics of about two million crystals made up of four chemical elements. The researchers were able to identify 90 previously unknown thermodynamically stable crystals that can be regarded as new materials. They report on their findings in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

Elpasolite is a glassy, transparent, shiny and soft mineral with a cubic crystal structure. First discovered in El Paso County (Colorado, USA), it can also be...

Im Focus: Complex hardmetal tools out of the 3D printer

For the first time, Fraunhofer IKTS shows additively manufactured hardmetal tools at WorldPM 2016 in Hamburg. Mechanical, chemical as well as a high heat resistance and extreme hardness are required from tools that are used in mechanical and automotive engineering or in plastics and building materials industry. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS in Dresden managed the production of complex hardmetal tools via 3D printing in a quality that are in no way inferior to conventionally produced high-performance tools.

Fraunhofer IKTS counts decades of proven expertise in the development of hardmetals. To date, reliable cutting, drilling, pressing and stamping tools made of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

European Health Forum Gastein 2016 kicks off today

28.09.2016 | Event News

Laser use for neurosurgery and biofabrication - LaserForum 2016 focuses on medical technology

27.09.2016 | Event News

Experts from industry and academia discuss the future mobile telecommunications standard 5G

23.09.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

The first genome of a coral reef fish

29.09.2016 | Life Sciences

Gentle sensors for diagnosing brain disorders

29.09.2016 | Medical Engineering

Swiss space research reaches for the sky

29.09.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>