Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sequence of human chromosome 7 is fine-tuned and finished

10.07.2003


Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, in collaboration with investigators at five other centers, have finished sequencing human chromosome 7. The findings are published in the July 10 issue of the journal Nature.



Chromosome 7 is the largest human chromosome to be sequenced so far. The analysis revealed that the chromosome has about 1,150 genes and 940 so-called pseudogenes, stretches of DNA that closely resemble genes but contain some genetic change that prevents them from functioning like a gene. The biological significance of pseudogenes is unknown.

"This work completes another volume in the genome encyclopedia at a high standard of quality and a high degree of continuity," says principal investigator Richard K. Wilson, Ph.D., director of Washington University’s Genome Sequencing Center and professor of genetics and of molecular microbiology. "The sequence for chromosome 7 will be very useful for follow-up studies that have a medical application."


The work may benefit research in cystic fibrosis, deafness, B-cell lymphoma and other cancers, genes for which are found on chromosome 7. Also found there is the gene for P-glycoprotein, a protein that enables cancer cells to resist anticancer drugs. Other important genes found on chromosome 7 include those that help control cell division and cell death, genes for taste and smell receptors and those involved in immune responses.

Chromosome 7 also has a relatively centrally located centromere, a small region found on all chromosomes that is important during cell division. Centromeres on other chromosomes sequenced so far are located near the tip of the chromosome, like a knob. The centromere on chromosome 7 divides the chromosome into a short arm and a long arm, both of which carry many genes. Sequencing proceeded from each end toward the centromere.

The centromere itself contains many short repetitive DNA sequences and few, if any, genes.

"We got in close to the centromere and characterized those repeat sequences for the first time," Wilson says.

The most challenging region of the chromosome to sequence was that containing genes for Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a rare genetic disorder characterized by mild mental retardation, unusual facial appearance and a narrowing of the aorta, the major artery leaving the heart. The WBS region was difficult to decipher because it contains large segments DNA with many duplicated genes, and the number of duplicated genes differs among individuals. Children with WBS are missing long stretches of these duplicated genes.

"It seems that multiple copies of these genes are necessary for normal development, and if any are lost, developmental abnormalities occur," Wilson says. "People who study this disease may find the chromosome 7 sequence data very helpful."

Next, Wilson and his colleagues will resequence certain genes on chromosome 7 from people with acute leukemia to better understand the genetic changes that give rise to the malignancy.


Hillier LW, Fulton RS, Fulton LA. et al. The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7. Nature, July 10, 2003.

Darrell E. Ward | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://medinfo.wustl.edu/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Cholesterol-lowering drugs may fight infectious disease
22.08.2017 | Duke University

nachricht Once invincible superbug squashed by 'superteam' of antibiotics
22.08.2017 | University at Buffalo

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

ShAPEing the future of magnesium car parts

23.08.2017 | Automotive Engineering

New insights into the world of trypanosomes

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

New Test for Rare Immunodeficiency

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>