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New aneurysm repair technology used for first time in Canada in Montreal


Physicians at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital are using a new technology to treat patients with brain aneurysms. Matrix© coils provide better stabilization of the aneurysms and promote faster healing of the lesion. So far, two patients have received the Matrix© coil treatment at the MNI/H. The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital is one of three centres in Canada chosen to use the new Matrix© coil. The others are Toronto Western and Foothills Hospital in Calgary.

“Our team is very excited to be able to offer this new technology to our patients,” explained Dr. Donatella Tampieri, Director of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology at the MNI/H. “This improvement in coil technology - a bioactive coated coil - occludes the aneurysm and promotes a faster and better organized clot preventing re-opening”.

Aneurysms are a weakening in the blood vessel wall which causes bulging. Aneurysms often remain without symptoms for a long time. A ruptured aneurysm will cause bleeding in the brain leading to brain damage and possibly death.

Physicians at the MNI/H treat more than 100 aneurysms per year and 40 of those are treated with coils.

The new Matrix© coated coil is designed to enhance the formation of the clot and seal the aneurysm. Although coil technology has been around for 13 years, the coated coil was developed in the last two years by a team from UCLA and has been successfully used in 400 patients worldwide. The Matrix© coil is manufactured by Boston Scientific.

Dr. Tampieri works closely with neurosurgeons, Dr. Denis Sirhan and Dr. David Sinclair and neuroanesthesiologists to bring improved treatments to patients with cerebrovascular diseases. In addition to the Matrix© coil, Dr. Tampieri and her team are also using a new stent technology to treat otherwise inoperable aneurysms. “These advanced technologies open new frontiers in the treatment of complex brain vascular lesions,“ said Dr. Tamperi ”As a leading neurological centre, The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital continues to bring the latest treatments to our patients thanks to an integrated team effort requiring close co-operation of physicians, nurses, x-ray-technologists and managers.

The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) ( is a leading Canadian academic hospital, providing tertiary care for difficult and complex conditions as well as providing primary and secondary care to patients of all ages. It receives a million ambulatory patient visits each year and 40,000 in-patient stays. The MUHC Research Institute is the largest medical research centre of its kind in Canada. The original partner hospitals of the MUHC are the Montreal General, the Royal Victoria, Montreal Chest, Montreal Neurological and Montreal Children’s Hospitals

The Montreal Neurological Institute ( is a McGill University ( research and teaching institute, dedicated to the study of the nervous system and neurological diseases. Since its founding in 1934 by the renowned Dr. Wilder Penfield, the MNI has helped put Canada on the international map. It is one of the world’s largest institutes of its kind; MNI researchers are world leaders in biotechnology, brain imaging, cognitive neuroscience and the study and treatment of epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and neuromuscular disorders.

For further information or to interview Dr. Tampieri, please contact:

Dr. Sandra McPherson
Montreal Neurological Institute
Tel: (514) 398-1902
Fax: (514) 398-8072

Sandra McPherson | McGill University
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