Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Experimental Cancer Drug Shrinks Tumors and Extends Survival in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients

02.06.2003


An experimental cancer drug named bevacizumab (trade name Avastin) is the first "anti-angiogenesis" drug to prove that it can shrink tumors and extend survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, according to a national clinical trial led by researchers at the Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center.



Bevacizumab is known as an anti-angiogenesis drug because it blocks the formation of blood vessels in tumors (a process called angiogenesis) and thus inhibits their growth.

Patients who received bevacizumab together with standard chemotherapy survived a median of five months longer than patients who received standard chemotherapy alone, the study showed. A five-month life extension is quite significant, given that patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer survive an average of 15 to 17 months, said Herbert Hurwitz, M.D., lead investigator of the study and an assistant professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center.


Furthermore, the new study lends critical support to the long-debated approach of choking off a tumor’s blood supply in order to inhibit tumor growth, said Hurwitz. This anti-angiogenesis approach has been touted as a plausible strategy against tumors but has never been proven successful in a large, randomized group of patients -- until now.

Hurwitz presented the results of the study, funded by Genentech, Inc., today (June 1) at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago.

"Our study offers important proof of the philosophy that targeting a tumor’s blood supply can, in fact, inhibit the tumor’s ability to proliferate," said Hurwitz. "Moreover, our current success will likely lead the cancer community to conduct large-scale clinical testing of bevacizumab as a treatment for other types of cancers."

In the current study, approximately 800 patients at various institutions nationwide were randomly assigned to receive bevacizumab plus standard chemotherapy (irinotecan, 5-FU, and leucovorin), or the standard chemotherapy with placebo.

Patients who received bevacizumab plus chemotherapy survived a median of 20.3 months, compared to 15.6 months for patients who received standard chemotherapy alone. Bevacizumab also delayed cancer progression for a median of 10.6 months versus 6.2 months for the standard chemotherapy. In addition, the bevacizumab and chemotherapy combination shrank tumors by at least half in 45 percent of patients, versus 35 percent in patients receiving standard chemotherapy alone.

"Metastatic colorectal cancer is a very aggressive disease, so we view these results with real optimism, as we now have another weapon in the fight against this cancer," said Hurwitz.

Bevacizumab works by inhibiting a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is secreted by malignant tumors in order to grow and maintain their blood vessels. When VEGF is blocked by bevacizumab, the tumor’s blood is diminished and the tumor shrinks and slows its spread.

Bevacizumab has fewer side effects than standard chemotherapy because it selectively targets blood vessels within tumors, which secrete more VEGF than do normal blood vessels in the body. The most frequent side effect was a moderate elevation in blood pressure, which was easily managed by medications, the study showed.

Hurwitz said that, while the bevacizumab results are very encouraging, the drug represents one of many weapons in a battery of drugs designed to combat the disease.

"Cancer is a very savvy opponent, and it often devises ways to circumvent our current methods of inhibiting it," said Hurwitz. "In addition, each tumor has its own characteristics that may cause it to behave differently from another patient’s tumor. For these reasons, no single therapy will work for every patient, so it’s important to develop multiple ways of combating the growth and spread of cancer."

Becky Levine | DukeNews
Further information:
http://dukemednews.org/news/article.php?id=6612

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland
26.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracy
25.07.2017 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau, study finds

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>