Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New hope for correcting irregular heartbeat

31.03.2003


Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital expands treatment options



People who suffer from irregular heartbeat now have a different treatment option, thanks to a new procedure being offered at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital.
RWJUH is the first hospital in New Jersey and one of a few centers in the nation to offer patients the option of Microwave Ablation as a stand-alone procedure to eliminate atrial fibrillation, the most common form of irregular heartbeat.

Microwave Atrial Ablation is a minimally invasive technique in which a precise beam of microwave energy is applied to the source of the heart’s abnormal electrical activity that causes a cardiac arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat.



During the procedure, a catheter is inserted through a two-inch incision to apply microwave energy to the left and right atria. This energy produces a discreet lesion to prevent the transfer of electrical signals.

“Patients who have failed conventional therapy and can tolerate general anesthesia with no other significant risk factors for surgery are eligible,” said Dr. Mark Anderson, Director of the Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgical Program at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Associate Professor of Surgery at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. “By now offering this as a stand-alone procedure, we hope to eliminate atrial fibrillation in a greater number of patients. Previously, Atrial Ablation was performed only in conjunction with other procedures, including Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery (CABG) and aortic and mitral valve surgeries.”

According to the American Heart Association, atrial fibrillation, found in 1-2 million Americans, occurs when the two small upper chambers of the heart, known as the atria, quiver instead of beating correctly. As a result, a blood clot may occur because the blood in the atria is not pumped out completely. A stroke may result if a part of the blood clot leaves the heart and gets stuck in an artery in the brain. Approximately 15% of strokes are caused this way.

Microwave Atrial Ablation/Page Two
Atrial fibrillation has a number of causes, including weak blood flow to the heart muscle, problems with the heart valves or damage to the heart from untreated high blood pressure. Other medical conditions can also cause atrial fibrillation. Thyroid problems, infection or lung disease can all lead to an irregular heartbeat.

Microwave Ablation is not the first treatment option for patients with atrial fibrillation. Initially, medication or electrical cardioversion (electric shock) are attempted, but in cases where these therapies are unsuccessful, Microwave Atrial Ablation may be considered.

Not everyone with atrial fibrillation may be aware of their condition, as symptoms do not usually appear until the heart rate increases to 150 beats per minute. These may include heart palpitations, shortness of breath, chest pain or an irregular pulse. Oppositely, atrial fibrillation may also cause the heart rate to decrease, showing symptoms of fatigue, dizziness or fainting.


###
Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, one of the nation’s leading academic health centers, is the principal hospital for UMDNJ – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and a member of the Robert Wood Johnson Health System & Network.

John Patella | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rwjuh.edu/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery
28.02.2017 | University of Central Florida

nachricht Cells adapt ultra-rapidly to zero gravity
28.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Existence of a new quasiparticle demonstrated

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sustainable ceramics without a kiln

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Biofuel produced by microalgae

28.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>