Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers develop first mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer

17.03.2003


Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers and their colleagues have developed a mouse model of the most prevalent and deadly form of human ovarian cancer -- epithelial ovarian cancer. The mouse model provides a better opportunity to study the cause of ovarian cancer, examine the genes involved and test preventive, diagnostic and treatment approaches that could be applied to human ovarian cancer.



"These transgenic mice offer us a valuable scientific tool that never before has been available to ovarian cancer researchers," explained Fox Chase Cancer Center’s Denise C. Connolly, Ph.D., corresponding author of the study, which appears in the March 15, 2003, issue of Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The mice engineered by Connolly and her colleagues develop epithelial ovarian cancer in both ovaries. This cancer arises in the surface, or epithelial, cells of the ovaries. The mouse model was made by introducing a genetically engineered DNA fragment into fertilized mouse eggs prior to their embryonic development. The fragment is a combination of a gene specific promoter and a potent oncogene. The oncogene, Simian virus 40 T antigen, triggers cancer development. The promoter is derived from a gene (Mullerian inhibitory substance type II receptor) that signals the expression of a specific protein found in cells covering the ovaries.


"It was critical to attach the oncogene to a regulator that would limit the cancer-causing gene’s expression to the ovary, including the epithelial ovarian cells," explained Connolly. "Using this strategy, we have generated transgenic animals that develop epithelial ovarian cancer that spreads to the peritoneal organs, similar to human epithelial ovarian cancers."

In humans, epithelial ovarian cancer is diagnosed in approximately 23,000 women each year. In 2003, it is estimated that 14,000 women will die of the disease, making it the fifth most common cancer in women in the United States.

Early detection of these tumors is challenging because there is no standard screening available for the disease. When ovarian cancer is diagnosed at early stages, the survival rate approaches 90 percent. However, the vast majority of cases of ovarian cancer are not identified until late stages, when the survival rate drops to only 30 to 40 percent.

"The development of mouse models of epithelial ovarian cancer may significantly facilitate advances in early detection and treatment of the disease," said Thomas C. Hamilton, Ph.D., senior member of the medical science division at Fox Chase Cancer Center and leader of the ovarian cancer research program. "Models such as this are critical to cancer research because they will allow us to study the progression of ovarian cancer from the very earliest stages to advanced disease.

"The next step is to test chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents that we hope will translate into meaningful improvements in the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. We’ll also study the relevant oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes for their ability to allow or trigger the cancer to develop," Hamilton added.

Other contributing researchers include Rudi Bao, M.D., Kasie C. Stephens, Timothy W. Poole, Ph.D., Xiang Hua and Skye S. Harris of Fox Chase Cancer Center; Alexander Yu. Nikitin, M.D., Ph.D., of Cornell University; and Barbara C. Vanderhyden, Ph.D., of the University of Ottawa.

Funding for this research is provided in part by a grant from the National Cancer Institute’s Mouse Models of Human Cancers Consortium (MMHCC), of which Hamilton is a member. Mouse models that recapitulate many aspects of the genesis, progression and clinical course of human cancers are valuable resources to cancer researchers engaged in a variety of basic, translational, clinical and epidemiological investigations.

MMHCC is a collaborative program designed to derive and characterize mouse models and to generate resources, information and innovative approaches to the application of mouse models in cancer research.



Additional grants supporting Dr., Hamilton’s research were received from the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute Specialized Program of Research Excellence for ovarian cancer, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Edgar Astrove, the Adler Foundation and the Evy Lessin Fund.

Fox Chase Cancer Center, one of the nation’s first comprehensive cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute in 1974, conducts basic and clinical research; programs of prevention, detection and treatment of cancer; and community outreach. For more information about Fox Chase activities, visit the Center’s web site at http://www.fccc.edu or call 1-888-FOX CHASE.

Karen Mallet | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fccc.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht 'Exciting' discovery on path to develop new type of vaccine to treat global viruses
18.09.2017 | University of Southampton

nachricht A new approach to high insulin levels
18.09.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

Im Focus: Artificial Enzymes for Hydrogen Conversion

Scientists from the MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion report in the first issue of the new journal JOULE.

Cell Press has just released the first issue of Joule, a new journal dedicated to sustainable energy research. In this issue James Birrell, Olaf Rüdiger,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

New quantum phenomena in graphene superlattices

19.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A simple additive to improve film quality

19.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>