Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Distance detection improves effect of spinal cord stimulation

20.02.2003


The effect of spinal cord stimulation, in chronic pain treatment, can be drastically improved using continuous distance detection. The strength of the stimulation pulses then depends on the distance measured between the electrodes and the spinal cord. In this way, negative side-effects belong to the past. These side-effects arise with a varying distance, causing diminished pain treatment in case of a distance that is too large, or unwanted sensations when the distance is too small. Emiel Dijkstra of the University of Twente developed a distance detection system. He finishes his PhD-research with the MESA+ research institute on February 27.



Spinal cord stimulation is effective in treatment of chronic pain. An electrode-array is implanted, sending short pulses to the spinal cord. This artificial nerve stimulation blocks certain pain signals. The electrodes have a fixed position, however, this means that the distance varies with movements of the patient. By measuring this distance along with the stimulation, the pulses can be adjusted continuously.

From MRI-scans, Dijkstra concludes that the distance can vary up to several millimeters. This has a direct effect on the signal reaching the spinal cord. With maximum distance, the signal can be too weak to have an effect. With minimum distance, the effect can be that the patient feels the pulses themselves, this is unpleasant as well. Using ultrasound, Dijkstra is now able to detect the distance. He therefore places a piezo-electric transducer on the electro-array.


This transducer has to face strict demands. It has to be able to distinguish between the spinal cord and the surrounding fluid, while the acoustic difference between them is small. Secondly, it has to be integrated along with the implantable electrodes. Its size therefore may not exceed 25 square millimetres, with a thickness of not more than two millimetres. And it has to be highly biocompatible: the human body has to accept this ‘intruder’.

In addition to these demands, the energy consumption must be close to zero. The electrode array is fed from outside the body, using radio signals, or a complete stimulation system is implanted in the abdomen region. In both cases, the distance detector may not consume substantial electric power.

Electric eals
The combination of electrodes, distance detection and control electronics provides a more comfortable and precise way of pain treatment. While in ancient Rome, already electric eals were used to treat pain, Dijkstra’s method is more friendly for the patient.

Emiel Dijkstra MscEE has performed his research under supervision of prof. Piet Bergveld within the MESA+ Institute of the University of Twente, and he was financially supported by Medtronic Inc., manufacturer of spinal cord stimulation electrodes.

Wiebe van der Veen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.mesaplus.utwente.nl/mutas/bios/
http://www.utwente.nl/nieuws/pers/cont_03-012.doc/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Oxygen can wake up dormant bacteria for antibiotic attacks
08.12.2016 | Penn State

nachricht NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology
07.12.2016 | Nanyang Technological University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Closing the carbon loop

08.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Applicability of dynamic facilitation theory to binary hard disk systems

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D

08.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>