Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Knee ’scaffold’ study offers new hope for injury victims

13.02.2003


Scientists from the University of Leicester are taking revolutionary research further with the potential to offer new hope for knee-injury victims.



They are following up international research that aims to improve knee cartilage repair techniques, termed ‘chrondrocyte implantation’. The procedure, developed in Sweden ten years ago, involves growing a patient’s knee cartilage cells in a laboratory, which are then implanted through open knee surgery. Recent exciting developments revolve around the materials or ‘scaffolds’ that the cells are grown on. The scaffold is inserted into the knee with the seeded cells growing on it, and disintegrates slowly once the knee’s cartilage cells have become established.

Dr Paul Jenkins from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Leicester, and orthopaedic surgeon Dr Mike Harding from the University’s Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Glenfield Hospital are collaborating to find the perfect biodegradeable polymer scaffold.


Dr Jenkins said: “We are using a polymer that is based on hyaluronic acid, which has great potential, because it degrades to an acid that is naturally present as a lubricant in all of our joints. The scaffold must be adhesive so that it stays in place inside the knee until enzymes in the knee degrade it. Probably the best known scaffold material is the benzyl ester of hyaluronic acid is extremely sticky when the chrondrocyte cells are growing in it. Our aim is to prepare and test new derivatives of hyaluronic acid to produce even better biodegradable matrix materials.”

Mr Harding said: “Cartilage tissue is mostly composed of a stiff, spongy matrix material produced by the cartilage cells. A property of the scaffold should be that it promotes the configuration of cartilage cells into the matrix shape. We are currently exploring the growth of cells onto different polymer scaffolds.”

The research is in the experimental stages, and has not yet been clinically tested. If the material proves to be a successful cartilage scaffold, extensive trials will be needed to allow it to be clinically tested for its reliability as a general surgical procedure for damaged knees.

Ather Mirza | alfa

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis
23.01.2017 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Team discovers how bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armor
20.01.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>