Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Low Estrogen Linked to Increased Riskof Coronary Artery Disease in Premenopausal Women

05.02.2003


According to an article in the February 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, coronary artery disease in young women appears to be related to estrogen deficiency, and there may be a link to psychosocial stress.

The findings are based on an analysis of statistics compiled from a major ongoing investigation of heart disease in women that is led by cardiac researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

“Although coronary artery disease is the leading killer of premenopausal women, taking even more lives than breast cancer does, most studies have focused on heart disease in older women. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that young women with low blood estrogen levels have a significantly greater prevalence of coronary artery disease,” said C. Noel Bairey Merz, M.D., the article’s first author.

Doctors have been aware that the prevalence of coronary artery disease increases after menopause, and for this population they have urged a greater use of coronary diagnostics. “Now we’re seeing that even young, premenopausal women lose protection from coronary artery disease when ovarian function and hormonal balances are disrupted,” Dr. Bairey Merz said. “We hope the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to gender-specific treatments that will reverse this process.”

Dr. Bairey Merz is the primary investigator of a four-center study, the Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE) sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. She holds Cedars-Sinai’s Women’s Guild Chair in Women’s Health, and directs the medical center’s Preventive and Rehabilitative Cardiac Center and the Women’s Health Program. She also serves as national spokesperson for the Women’s HeartAdvantage campaign, a nationwide program designed to help women learn more about the symptoms and treatment of heart disease and heart attacks.

WISE consists of 855 women with coronary risk factors undergoing coronary angiography for suspected ischemia – lack of blood flow and resulting oxygen deficiency to the heart. For the study on hypoestrogenemia (low estrogen levels) and coronary artery disease in premenopausal women, statistics on 95 women were analyzed.

The researchers’ attention centers on women with decreased estrogen levels caused by a dysfunctional hypothalamus. One of the many functions of the hypothalamus, a gland in the center of the brain, is the regulation of the ovaries in the production of estrogen and other reproductive hormones. Regular fluctuations of hormones control menstrual cycles in premenopausal women while an abnormal decrease can cause disruption of menstruation (amenorrhea).

Although the study establishes a link between low estrogen levels and coronary artery disease (CAD) in premenopausal women, it was not designed to determine cause and effect. The researchers note that a currently unknown mechanism may enable heart disease to reduce estrogen levels, or a separate mechanism may underlie both disorders. On the other hand, previous studies support the hypothesis that the hormone deficiency plays a role in the development of coronary artery disease. There is also evidence that psychosocial stress is a precipitating factor.

Studies in both animals and humans have documented an association between “environmental psychologic stress” and disruption of the menstrual cycle due to dysfunction of the hypothalamus. Atherosclerosis – plaque buildup that narrows arteries – has been found to be “significantly accelerated” in monkeys that have low estrogen levels caused by hypothalamic dysfunction induced by stress. In the current study, a significant number of women found to have hypoestrogenemia of hypothalamic origin were taking anti-anxiety medications, a fact that suggests the possibility that stress played a developmental role.

The study also supports the concept that physiological differences between men and women may help to explain the fact that young women with heart disease have a markedly higher mortality rate than their male counterparts of the same age. Previous animal and human research has shown that hypoestrogenemia in women is accompanied by narrowing and even constriction of coronary arteries in response to a stressor.

“Our current results document that premenopausal women with CAD may have hypoestrogenemia, and, therefore, may have more adverse coronary arterial dysfunction,” the article says. “Although we are unable to link these results with mortality in this relatively small sample size, they suggest that premenopausal women with CAD could be at a higher mortality risk stemming from hypoestrogenemia-related adverse physiologic effects.”

The study was supported by contracts from the NHLBI (N01-HV-68161, N01-HV-68162, N01-HV-68163, and N01-HV-68164), a GCRC grant from the National Center for Research Resources (M01-RR00425), and grants from the Gustavus and Louis Pfeiffer Research Foundation (Danville, N.J.), The Women’ s Guild of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Los Angeles), and the Ladies Hospital Aid Society of Western Pennsylvania (Pittsburgh).

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is one of the largest nonprofit academic medical centers in the Western United States. For the fifth straight two-year period, it has been named Southern California’s gold standard in health care in an independent survey. Cedars-Sinai is internationally renowned for its diagnostic and treatment capabilities and its broad spectrum of programs and services, as well as breakthrough in biomedical research and superlative medical education. Named one of the 100 "Most Wired" hospitals in health care in 2001, the Medical Center ranks among the top 10 non-university hospitals in the nation for its research activities.



CITATION:
Journal of the American College of Cardiology, February 5, 2003,
“Hypoestrogenemia of Hypothalamic Origin and Coronary Artery Disease in
Premenopausal Women: A Report from the NHLBI-Sponsored WISE Study”


Sandra Van | Van Communications

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht One gene closer to regenerative therapy for muscular disorders
01.06.2017 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

nachricht The gut microbiota plays a key role in treatment with classic diabetes medication
01.06.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

Im Focus: Optoelectronic Inline Measurement – Accurate to the Nanometer

Germany counts high-precision manufacturing processes among its advantages as a location. It’s not just the aerospace and automotive industries that require almost waste-free, high-precision manufacturing to provide an efficient way of testing the shape and orientation tolerances of products. Since current inline measurement technology not yet provides the required accuracy, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is collaborating with four renowned industry partners in the INSPIRE project to develop inline sensors with a new accuracy class. Funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the project is scheduled to run until the end of 2019.

New Manufacturing Technologies for New Products

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metal

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>