Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Europe-wide Study Seeks Causes Of Oral Cancers

04.02.2003


Scientists from The University of Manchester are playing a key role in a major Europe-wide study - believed to be the largest of its kind – of cancers of the mouth, pharynx and larynx (throat) and oesophagus (gullet). Incidences of these cancers are increasing faster in the UK than almost anywhere else in western Europe.



Every year, cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract kill approximately 10,000 in the UK alone. Alarmingly, these cancers are affecting younger people and are on the increase across Europe.

Professor Gary Macfarlane, of The University of Manchester’s Unit of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, is leading the team responsible for recruiting 400 people suffering from these cancers for the study in the UK. The project, which includes teams from the University of Newcastle and The Information and Statistics Division of NHS Scotland, will recruit subjects from the North West and North East of England, and the West of Scotland.


Across the whole of Europe the project will recruit 2,700 patients. For each patient recruited, the study needs to recruit a healthy individual from the general population, of the same age and sex and from the same area. People will be selected at random from General Practitioners’ lists and then contacted by their GP asking them to participate in the study.

Professor Macfarlane and his team will be recruiting 130 patients from the North-West alone, involving hospitals in Manchester, Salford, Blackburn, Blackpool and Preston.

Alcohol and tobacco are major risk factors in cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract. There are, however, enormous differences in the incidence of these cancers across Europe that are not directly related to consumption of alcohol or tobacco. By studying 2,700 people suffering from these cancers across eight European countries, the ARCAGE (Alcohol Related Cancers And Genetic Susceptibility in Europe) project will help identify those groups at high risk of developing these cancers.

Involving 12 centres across eight European countries, the project will study environmental factors, such as drinking and smoking, along with genetic susceptibility. This should enable researchers to discover who is at risk and why more young people are being affected by these cancers.

Everyone recruited will be interviewed using a study questionnaire, collecting information on alcohol consumption, dietary exposures and lifestyle exposures. A blood sample will also be taken to allow analysis of genetic factors that may put people at high risk.

Professor Macfarlane said: “This project should give us a better understanding of the risk factors involved with these cancers and why they are becoming more common. The results will inform the development of prevention programmes for these types of cancers.”

Jo Grady | alfa
Further information:
http://news.man.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Routing gene therapy directly into the brain
07.12.2017 | Boston Children's Hospital

nachricht New Hope for Cancer Therapies: Targeted Monitoring may help Improve Tumor Treatment
01.12.2017 | Berliner Institut für Gesundheitsforschung / Berlin Institute of Health (BIH)

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

Blockchain is becoming more important in the energy market

05.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New research identifies how 3-D printed metals can be both strong and ductile

11.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

11.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

What makes corals sick?

11.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>