Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Increased bone mass in a calcitonin knockout mouse full of surprises

17.12.2002


Increased bone mass in a calcitonin knockout mouse full of surprises



Bone is in a constant state of remodeling, during which osteoclasts remove old bone (resorption) and osteoblasts form new bone (formation). Calcitonin is a hormone produced by the thyroid gland and inhibits bone resorption. Following menopause, the rate of bone loss is accelerated, however women with post-menopausal osteoporosis that are treated with calcitonin (by injection or nasal spray) demonstrate increased bone mass and strength, in addition to a decrease in the rate of bone fractures. Following alternative processing, the gene encoding calcitonin (CT/CGRP) also encodes a second peptide: calcitonin gene-related peptide-a (CGRPa), however the role of this peptide in bone metabolism has not been clearly defined.

To better understand the role of calcitonin and CGRP-a in bone metabolism Robert Gagel and colleagues at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, USA, created mice in which the CT/CGRP gene had been deleted. Given that both calcitonin and CGRP have been shown to inhibit bone resorption and CGRP is known to stimulate bone formation, the authors predicted that there would be either no effect of this deletion on bone mass, or there could be some bone loss.


In the December 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the authors report their surprising finding that CT/CGRP-deficient mice have greater bone mass, increased bone formation, and were able to maintain bone mass during estrogen deficiency by increasing bone formation. These findings suggest an important and novel function for the products of the CT/CGRP gene, that was previously unrecognized. They also suggest that the development of an antagonist to the CT/CGRP gene product(s) may be useful in the prevention of bone loss associated with estrogen deficiency.

Mone Zaidi and colleagues from the Mount Sinai Bone Program at Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, discuss these surprising findings in their accompanying commentary.

CONTACT:
Robert F. Gagel
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders
1400 Holcombe Blvd.
Box 433
Houston, TX 77030
USA
Phone: 713-792-6517
Fax: 713-794-1818
E-mail: rgagel@mdanderson.org

ACCOMPANYING COMMENTARY: Calcitonin and bone formation: a knockout full of surprises

CONTACT:
Mone Zaidi
Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Annenberg 5, PO 1055
Division of Endocrinology
One Gustave Levy Place
New York, NY 10029
USA
Phone: 212-241-8797
Fax: 212-426-8312
E-mail: mone.zaidi@mssm.edu

Brooke Grindlinger | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.the-jci.org/press/17425.pdf
http://www.the-jci.org/press/14218.pdf

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism
19.01.2018 | Weill Cornell Medicine

nachricht Researchers identify new way to unmask melanoma cells to the immune system
17.01.2018 | Duke University Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristors

22.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

22.01.2018 | Earth Sciences

Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parent

22.01.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks Wissenschaft & Forschung
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>