Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gene therapy promising for preventing restenosis

17.09.2002


An experimental gene transfer technique shut down cell re-growth in the arteries’ interior lining and reduced the inflammatory response – two main causes of re-narrowing of newly opened blood vessels, researchers report in today’s rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.



The process that opens blocked blood vessels – either inflating a tiny balloon to force open the narrowed vessel (angioplasty) or inserting a tiny mesh tube called a stent to serve as a scaffold to widen the opening – can damage the delicate lining of blood vessels, says Seppo Yla-Herttuala, M.D., Ph.D., professor of molecular medicine at the University of Kuoppio, Finland.

"This damage – rather than a progression of heart disease – is believed to cause rapid growth of new cells in the vessel wall, which can cause re-blockage, or restenosis, in the vessel," he says.


Earlier studies suggested that a key player in this process is a biological reaction called oxidative stress. When the endothelium – the blood vessel lining – is damaged, it sends a signal that increases oxidative stress, which means that the body produces more free radicals. The oxygen derivatives known as free radicals are very active chemical compounds "that can destroy almost anything," he says.

One of the most common of these compounds is the superoxide anion, a free radical that increases when the endothelium is damaged. At the same time, endothelial damage causes a decrease in concentrations of vascular superoxide dismutase or SOD, an enzyme that works inside and outside cells as a powerful antioxidant to control levels of free radicals. Yla-Herttuala and his colleagues theorized that by injecting the gene for extra cellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) into damaged blood vessels, they could control free radical damage and thereby short-circuit the process that leads to restenosis.

In the study they tested this hypothesis by using a deactivated virus to deliver EC-SOD to cells in the arterial walls of animals. Researchers treated 18 New Zealand white rabbits with the gene and 18 with placebo. The animals were analyzed two and four weeks later to determine if the gene therapy had worked. At each follow-up the researchers confirmed that the gene transfer was successful.

At two weeks the EC-SOD group had 10-fold fewer macrophages (markers of inflammation) than the control group and 20-fold less macrophage accumulation at four weeks. Moreover, there was a significant reduction in superoxide anion production in the active gene transfer group, he says.

"EC-SOD has already been purified and commercially produced. The virus that we used has been similarly tested, so we expect that it will only take about two years to complete pre-clinical studies before we can begin human trials," Yla-Herttuala says.

In human studies, EC-SOD would be transferred "after a stent is placed and it would be delivered in the stented area and in the areas immediately outside the stent. The study demonstrates that the enzyme is also secreted by the cells after transfer so that it affects both the immediate site of transfer and the areas within a few centimeters of that site."

Co-authors were Mikko O. Laukkanen, Ph.D.; Antti Kivelä, M.D.; Tuomas Rissanen, B.M.; Juha Rutanen, B.M.; Minna K. Karkkainen, M.Sc.; Olli Leppanen, M.D.; and Jan Hinrich Brasen, M.D., Ph.D.

Carole Bullock | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.americanheart.org/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Hot cars can hit deadly temperatures in as little as one hour
24.05.2018 | Arizona State University

nachricht 3D images of cancer cells in the body: Medical physicists from Halle present new method
16.05.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

When corals eat plastics

24.05.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Surgery involving ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure

24.05.2018 | Medical Engineering

First chip-scale broadband optical system that can sense molecules in the mid-IR

24.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>