Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ball to occlude the aorta during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

16.09.2002


Jesus Manuel Labandeira in his doctoral thesis, read in the University of Navarre, tested this technique in pigs due to the similarity to the human cardiovascular system.



According to the results obtained by doctor Labandeira, the use of a occlusion ball in the aorta duplicates the blood pressure that goes to heart and brain during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Improving the results of CPR


Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) constitutes one of the most emblematic activities of emergency services since its introduction in the 60s. This technique involves ventilating the patient and applying him simultaneously a series of thoracic compressions. However, it has been observed that although the CPR is done correctly, blood quantity that circulates is limited, the blood flow does not even reach 50 % of normal values. Now the application of new techniques to increase blood quantity that goes to heart and brain is being tested.

In order to improve the results of CPR, Jesus Manuel Labandeira has made a kind of short circuit. It involves introducing a catheter with a ball through the groin via femoral artery and installing it in the aorta, under the diaphragm. When the ball is pumped up, blood is redistributed so that when blood comes out from heart it does not reach less vital extremities, but it goes to heart and brain, the most important organs.

According to doctor Labandeira, introducing a ball in the aorta, blood pressure that comes to heart and brain is practically twice as much as during normal CPR. At aortic arterial pressure it can be observed a similar phenomenon. The arterial pressure of a living person is 120 mm Hg systolic and 80 mm Hg diastolic (120/80). At the beginning of a standard CPR, the values are about 41 mm Hg systolic and 20 mm Hg diastolic (41/20). By using the ball the pressure is 74 mm Hg systolic and 39 mm Hg diastolic (74/39). They are low values, but it is twice as much as during normal CPR.

So the conclusion of the thesis of Labandeira shows that the use of a intra-aortic occlusion ball increases the systolic, diastolic and average arterial pressures, as well as the coronary and cerebral perfusion pressures. In order to obtain better results, it is important to apply this technique in time. On the other side, the necropsy carried out to pigs by Labandeira after the experiment shown that there were no internal damages produced in viscera or vascular structures.

Experiment with 14 pigs

The study of Labandeira has been done with fourteen pigs, because it is one of the most similar animals to human from the cardiovascular point of view.

A situation of cardiorespiratory arrest was introduced to the pig via ventricular fibrillation, once it was given an anaesthetic to avoid suffering. Then, CPR was started, subjecting the pig to four periods of five minutes each, alternating the CPR with and without intra-aortic occlusion ball. The results with the ball were better than without it.

Bearing in mind the future application of that system in humans, the introduction of a ball into the aorta does not suppose a significant difficulty from the technical point of view, because the femoral artery is relatively a simple way of vascular access, allowing the introduction of the catheter in less that five minutes.

The thesis of Labandeira has been published in the scientific magazine American Journal of Emergency Medicine. Actually, two more groups of scientist are investigating this subject; one in Sweden and the other one in the United States.

Garazi Andonegi | alfa

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht 'Icebreaker' protein opens genome for t cell development, Penn researchers find
21.02.2018 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Similarities found in cancer initiation in kidney, liver, stomach, pancreas
21.02.2018 | Washington University School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signals

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

The “Holy Grail” of peptide chemistry: Making peptide active agents available orally

21.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expected

21.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>