Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UCSD Study Shows Increased Transmission Of Drug-Resistant HIV Infection

08.08.2002


An increase in the transmission rate of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), now affecting as many as one in five newly infected persons, has been discovered by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine.



In a five-year, multi-center study of more than 300 patients in 10 North American cities, the investigators found that the transmission rate of drug-resistant HIV had more than doubled, resulting in impaired patient-response once anti-retroviral therapy was provided. The results are published in the August 8, 2002 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

According to lead author Susan Little, M.D., UCSD assistant professor of medicine, and senior author Douglas Richman, M.D., UCSD professor of medicine, resistance was noted in persons on single-drug therapy as well as those receiving potent multi-drug treatment.


"This points to the importance of routine drug-resistance tests for newly infected patients so that the most effective first-line treatment program can be initiated," said Richman, who is director of the UCSD AIDS Research Institute and the Research Center for AIDS and HIV Infection at the Veterans Affairs (VA) San Diego Health Care System.

Although past studies had estimated the transmission of drug-resistant HIV at 1 to 11 percent of newly infected patients, the new findings show the prevalence of viral mutations associated with resistance increased from 8.0 percent between 1995-98 to 22.7 percent during 1999-2000.

From May 1995 through June 2000, 377 individuals with primary HIV infection who had not yet received treatment were recruited for the study. Study subjects were predominantly non-Hispanic white men whose risk factor for HIV infection was unprotected sex with men, a group in which HIV drug resistance appears to be most prevalent, the researchers said.

Pre-treatment blood samples were analyzed to determine clinical resistance to 15 currently approved HIV drugs. In addition, the blood samples were analyzed for resistance to multi-drug regimens.

Response to treatment was then measured in 202 of the patients. Investigators looked at the length of time to viral suppression and/or the time to virologic failure, when treatment was no longer effective. Although viral suppression was demonstrated by week 24 of therapy in all but one patient, the median time to suppression was 56 days for those without the drug-resistant strain and 88 days for those with the drug-resistant form of the virus. The time to virologic failure was significantly shorter among those with drug-resistance.

In research results presented by Richman in December 2001 at the American Society for Microbiology, it was noted that more than three-quarters of HIV patients with a measurable viral load who are receiving care in the United States carry strains of the virus that are resistant to drug therapy.

In the current New England Journal of Medicine article, Little, Richman and their team said that "increases in the prevalence of drug-resistant virus among patients with established HIV infection may be associated with more frequent transmission of drug-resistant virus to newly infected persons in their community."

The authors also noted that "in both the developed and developing worlds, the treatment strategies for patients newly infected with HIV should take into account the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance."

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. In addition to Little and Richman, authors were Sarah Holte, Ph.D., Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Ann C. Collier, M.D., University of Washington; Jean-Pierre Routy, M.D., McGill University Health Center, Montreal; Eric S. Daar, M.D., UCLA Medical Center; Marty Markowitz, M.D., Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center, New York; Richard A. Koup, M.D., Vaccine Research Center, National Institutes of Health; John W. Mellors, M.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine; Elizabeth Connick, M.D., University of Colorado Health Sciences Center; Brian Conway, M.D., University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Michael Kilby, M.D., University of Alabama, Birmingham; and Jeannette M. Whitcomb, Ph.D., and Nicholas S. Hellmann, M.D., ViroLogic, South San Francisco.


Media Contact:
Sue Pondrom
619-543-6164
spondrom@ucsd.edu

Sue Pondrom | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://health.ucsd.edu/news

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>