Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Post-menopausal therapy to improve women’s quality of life

30.05.2008
A recent research work by the University of Granada advises post-menopausal women the use of Replacement Hormone Therapy (RHT) for at least five years.

The study reveals that the fears associated with the RHT are product of disinformation and are often against clinical evidences. Some of those concerns are fear of collateral effects such as weight gain, breast cancer or the risk of a thromboembolic disease.

The passing of time makes ovaries lose their ability to produce estrogens and progesterone, the hormones which regulate the menstrual cycle. In this stage, when menstruation cesses, there appear physical and psychical changes such as hot flushes, sweating, vaginal dryness, articulation and bone pain, headaches, insomnia, sadness, depression and loss of memory, known as climateric symptoms. In Spain, the average age for the cessation of the menstrual cycle is 50 years old. In the Western countries, about 17% of the population belongs to the post-menstrual group.

Against the discomfort derived from the cessation of menstruation, there are medical treatments which contribute to maintain the quality of life of women in the face of the described changes. One of the treatments proposed is the so-called Replacement Hormone Therapy (RHT).

Fears about this therapy have been erroneously exaggerated, attributing to it secondary effects such as weight gain, breast cancer and risk of a thromboembolic disease.

A study carried out at the University of Granada on more than 500 postmenopausal patients rationalizes the fears above mentioned; and it concludes recommending the use of the hormone therapy, if necessary, for at least five years, under periodic medical controls.

The study

The research work has been read as a doctoral thesis by Dr Otilia Ruth González Vanegas, under the supervision of Dr José Luis Cuadros López and Dr Rosa María Sabatel López (Department of Medicine of the UGR, San Cecilio University Hospital) and Dr Ángela María Cuadros Celorrio (Hospital of Úbeda).

The work, entitled “Five-year later assessment of the use of different models of Replacement Hormone Therapy (RHT) during post-menopause”, started from the question: “¿how long must RHT be used considering the beneficial and adverse effects?”. They studied the clinical histories of 534 women who, between 1989 and 2004, have attended periodically medical, laboratory and mammography tests at the Menopause Unit of the San Cecilio teaching Hospital of Granada.

González Vanegas’ study also concludes that the discomfort derived from menopause falls in the first six months of application of any of the RHT, with the consequent improvement in women’s quality of life.

The observations allow to conclude that, regardless the type of hormone therapy followed, the symptomatology improves, there are no weight changes, the lipid profile improves (cholesterol, triglycerides); bone quality gets better and breast cancer is less frequent than in general population, especially in the group which only received estrogens.

The results of this research work have been published in journals such as Climateric or Menopausia.

Antonio Marín Ruiz | alfa
Further information:
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/investigacion/index.php

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>