Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Slow reading speed indicates quality of life deficit

15.05.2008
A research team from the Instituto Oftalmológico (Ophthalmology Institute) in Alicante has developed a test in Spanish called the RADNER VISSUM test, which enables near vision and reading speed to be evaluated in a standardised way.

This reading test, which already exists in English, Danish, Turkish and German, enables us to ascertain that we read an average of 80 words per minute and that that we take just over 3 seconds to read a 14 word-sentence.

The tests that are usually used to measure near visual acuity are governed by different criteria that affect the form and content of the sentences used, which makes a final evaluation difficult. The study has been published in the latest issue of the Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery and has been carried out by the research group headed by Jorge L. Alió.

The design of this new test is based on the Radner method, and has been standardised in Spanish to reflect the similarity in the number and length of the words, as well as lexical and grammatical levels of difficulty. The reading tables contain 24 phrases and are also similar in number of syllables and words (14).

“This test measures both near visual acuity and reading speed from any distance, i.e., the most comfortable reading distance for the patient”, affirmed Alió. The design of this test is based on an adjustment scale for distance that allows ophthalmologists to translate the visual acuity values obtained into the baseline reading distance of 40 cm.

The study evaluates each patient’s reading capability by measuring his/her reading speed. The researchers point out that “a normal reading speed is 80 words per minute”. The test was tried out on different groups of patients with different cultural levels in order to obtain an understandable trial, regardless of their socio-cultural levels.

An experiment with 60 persons without eye disease

The study evaluated 60 volunteers without any eye disease that could influence the results. The participants were divided into two groups (university education and junior school education). The first group attained an average reading time of 3.51 seconds, and the second group attained 4.12 seconds, the average reading time being 3.81 seconds for all of the sentences.

“As was expected, the reading time was longer for those phrases the readers found most difficult to read. So, the group with a lower level of education made more errors in reading and they read slower than the group with a university education”, underline the authors.

The research can be used in cases of eye disease (cataracts, macular degeneration and amblyopia), by taking into consideration that “a slow reading speed indicates visual function and quality of life deficits”. In this way, this test could be used in future studies to measure the reading speed of patients with multifocal intraocular lens implants (IOLs).

SINC Team | alfa
Further information:
http://www.plataformasinc.es

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>