Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

USM to set up Malaysia's first Craniofacial Surgery Excellence Centre

29.04.2008
With cooperation with the Australian Cranio-Maxillo Facial Foundation, University Science Malaysia (USM) offers hope to local patients with facial and skull deformities.

USM OFFERS HOPE TO PATIENTS WITH FACIAL DEFORMITIES

University Science Malaysia (USM) plans to offer specialist surgery to patients born with facial and skull deformities.

This follows USM's move to transfer craniofacial technology into the country -- through training programmes and by sending students to Australia, a country well known for its excellence in the craniofacial field.

In line with the effort, USM is in the midst of planning to establish the country's first Craniofacial Surgery Excellence Centre.

USM Medical Science Faculty lecturer, Dr. Zainul Ahmad Rajion said, facial and skull anomalies or the scientific term Cranio-facial deformity -- happened when a baby's head and skull is not join appropriately when it is born.

He said the joining stage happened early during pregnancy and would caused deformity in a baby's physical look. For instance, a smaller head compared to normal babies.

The abnormality, according to Dr. Zainul, could be due to genetic or environment such as crouzon syndrome, apert syndrome dan hemifacial microsomia.

“Prior to this, the method used to treat and operate patients with such deformity, could only be found in Australia with the help of craniofacial specialists there,” he explained.

But he said, patients would have to bear exorbitant costs, of up to hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Dr. Zainul said, the Australian Cranio-Maxillo Facial Foundation (ACMFF), based in Adelaide and chaired by David J. David is among the best specialists to give a new life to those with facial and skull deformities.

He added that USM was fortunate enough to foster cooperation with ACMFF three years ago and at this stage, USM has been given the opportunity to transfer the know-how to Malaysia, through ways mutually agreed.

“We have signed a Memorandum of Understanding today (April 23, 2008) to implement various training programmes and joint research with ACMFF.

“Through this close cooperation between USM and ACMFF, USM will try its best to provide a new life to patients with facial and skull deformities in this country,” he explained.

Dr. Zainul has been in Australia for two years to improve his craniofacial surgery skills and is a pioneer in establishing the fraternity in Malaysia.

On future plans, he said : “We will form a team of specialist doctors covering the various fields of plastic surgery, neurology, eye, ear and others – to provide the best service to the people.

“In Malaysia, there is no such team. We have various specialist doctors but they operate separately and according to their own capacity.

“In future, the new team will work to gether to give specialized operation to each patient,” he said.

Meanwhile, Prof. Dato’ Dzulkifli Abdul Razak said, USM was fortunate to be given an opportunity to cooperate with ACMFF particularly in preparing a specialist work force for the people, in the field of craniofacial.

He added that USM hopes to expand this help to local communities around the world.

“Through the MoU, we aim to upgrade our achievement and set up a medical specialist unit to help those in need,” he said.

Mohamad Abdullah | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.usm.my/v3/berita-penuh.asp?id=5761&idform=7

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

nachricht Disrupted fat breakdown in the brain makes mice dumb
19.05.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

Im Focus: Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel’s Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances.

Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral part of almost all organic compounds. Molecules and sections of macromolecules are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

Media accreditation opens for historic year at European Health Forum Gastein

16.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New approach to revolutionize the production of molecular hydrogen

22.05.2017 | Materials Sciences

Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus

22.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan

22.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>