Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Few women regret sterilization procedures

18.06.2002


Few of the women who undergo tubal sterilization or whose husbands undergo vasectomy later go on to regret either procedure, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The study appears in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.



The study found the proportion of women who experience regret was essentially the same -about 6 to 7 percent-five years after their husbands’ vasectomy or their own tubal sterilization. The study also found that substantial conflict between a woman and her husband increases the risk of regret after either vasectomy or tubal sterilization.

"This study is reassuring in that a comparatively small number of the women in the study experienced regret after either they or their husbands underwent a voluntary sterilization procedure," said Duane Alexander, M.D., Director of the NICHD. "However, the finding also underscores the importance of the health care professional in providing thorough counseling for those considering sterilization as a means of family planning."


The researchers, Denise J. Jamieson, M.D. and her colleagues, analyzed data from The U.S. Collaborative Review of Sterilization (CREST), which enrolled women ages 18 to 44 who underwent tubal sterilization at medical centers in six cities around the country between 1985 and 1987. This analysis included data collected from 3,672 sterilized women and 525 other women whose husbands underwent vasectomy, all of whom were asked about regret at follow up visits throughout the course of the study.

Although earlier CREST papers addressed the probability of regret among a larger group of sterilized women, the current report is the first to evaluate regret among women whose husbands underwent vasectomy and to make comparisons to women undergoing tubal sterilization.

The researchers found that the chance of a woman experiencing regret within 5 years after her husband’s vasectomy was only 6.1 percent, a figure which did not differ significantly from the 7.0 percent of women who, 5 years later, regretted tubal sterilization.

"It’s reassuring that such large percentages of those who chose either vasectomy or tubal sterilization were satisfied with their decisions," said one of the paper’s authors, Steven Kaufman, M.D., of NICHD’s Contraception and Reproductive Health Branch. Similarly, the researchers found that the overall cumulative probability of the woman requesting that the vasectomy be reversed was low-2.0 percent-and statistically indistinguishable from the corresponding figure (2.2 percent) for women requesting reversal of tubal sterilization.

Women who experienced substantial conflict with their husbands before the husbands’ vasectomy were more than 25 times as likely to request that their husbands undergo vasectomy reversal as those who did not experience such conflict. Among couples with substantial conflict prior to tubal sterilization, the woman was about 3 times as likely to express regret and 5 times as likely to request reversal as those not reporting such conflict. The study did not ask women to specify the nature of the conflict, so the authors do not know whether the conflicts were about the sterilization procedure or about other matters.

"In counseling patients about contraceptive options, the probability of regret associated with both male and female sterilization should be addressed, as should the possibility of regret associated with unintended pregnancy for women who do not choose a highly effective method of contraception," the investigators wrote.


The NICHD is part of the National Institutes of Health, the biomedical research arm of the federal government. The Institute sponsors research on development, before and after birth; maternal, child, and family health; reproductive biology and population issues; and medical rehabilitation. NICHD publications, as well as information about the Institute, are available from the NICHD Web site, http://www.nichd.nih.gov, or from the NICHD Clearinghouse, 1-800-370-2943; e-mail NICHDClearinghouse@mail.nih.gov.


Marianne Duffy | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland
26.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracy
25.07.2017 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>