Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Minimally invasive fibroid treatment fares well in multicenter trial

A new multicenter trial found that uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a good alternative to hysterectomy in women with symptomatic fibroids. The findings of the Embolisation versus Hysterectomy (EMMY) Trial appear in the March issue of the journal Radiology.

“After two years, patients who had undergone UAE reported health-related quality of life equal to that of women who had undergone hysterectomy,” said study co-author Jim A. Reekers, M.D., Ph.D., an interventional radiologist at Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Uterine fibroids are benign growths of the muscle inside the uterus. According to the National Institutes of Health, at least 25 percent of women in the U.S. age 25 to 50 suffer from symptomatic uterine fibroids. Fibroid symptoms can include excessive menstrual bleeding, enlarged uterine size, frequent urination, pelvic pressure or pain and infertility.

According to the National Women’s Health Information Center, fibroids are the primary reason for surgical removal of the uterus, accounting for approximately one-third of the 600,000 hysterectomies performed annually in the U.S.

UAE is a minimally invasive fibroid treatment in which catheters are placed in each of the two uterine arteries, and small particles are injected to block the arterial branches that supply blood to the fibroids. The fibroid tissue dies, the masses shrink and, in most cases, symptoms are relieved. UAE requires only a local anesthetic and has a shorter recovery period than hysterectomy.

“UAE has a number of benefits compared to hysterectomy,” said co-author Wouter J.K. Hehenkamp, M.D., gynecology resident at Academic Medical Centre. “With UAE, there is a faster recovery time, a shorter hospital stay and, most importantly, the uterus is not removed.”

For the EMMY trial, 177 women with uterine fibroids and heavy menstrual bleeding scheduled to undergo hysterectomy were randomly assigned to undergo UAE (88 women) or hysterectomy (89 women). During a 24-month follow-up period, 20 percent of women who had undergone embolization in the trial subsequently underwent hysterectomy due to insufficient symptomatic relief. Over the same period, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was measured six times for all women in the trial with a series of scientifically validated questionnaires, which assessed various physical, mental and functional components contributing to quality of life, as well as overall satisfaction with the treatment.

Results showed that HRQOL improved significantly in all patients six months after treatment, except in the defecation distress inventory, which improved significantly in the UAE patients at six-month follow-up, but not the hysterectomy patients. Six weeks after treatment, the UAE patients also scored significantly higher scores on the physical component summary, which measured factors related to physical function.

After 24 months, no HRQOL differences were observed between the two groups, but while more than 90 percent of patients in both groups were at least moderately satisfied with the treatment they received, the hysterectomy patients reported a higher level of overall satisfaction. This may be attributable to the fact that they no longer experienced menstrual cycles or worried that their symptoms would recur. However, previous studies lasting several years have shown that it is rare for treated fibroids to regrow or for new fibroids to develop after UAE.

“For those women seeking absolute certainty of being asymptomatic after treatment, I would recommend a hysterectomy,” Dr. Reekers said. “But for women who wish to retain their uterus and who desire a fast recovery, I would definitely recommend UAE.”

Maureen Morley | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>