Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The big screen - tackling diabetes early to avoid complications

05.06.2002


Researchers at the University of Cambridge have launched a major study to assess the benefits of screening for Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes, and is on the increase, due largely to the rise in obesity and sedentary lifestyles.

The study, named ADDITION, is based at the Department of Public Health and Primary Care. Launching the study, one of the Principal Investigators Dr Simon Griffin, explained its aim.

"Undetected diabetes is common and often people are suffering quite serious complications by the time they become aware that they have the disease. Although it seems obvious that early detection will result in benefits, this remains to be proven. The ADDITION study will provide important information which will help decide whether screening can make a major impact on reducing the burden of diabetes complications.



"As a major cause of heart disease, visual problems, renal complications and foot disorders diabetes is a serious problem for sufferers and a costly one for taxpayers, accounting for 5-8% of total NHS expenditure," said Dr Griffin.

20,000 middle-aged people across Cambridgeshire who are potentially at increased risk of diabetes are being sent invitations to visit their local GPs for a simple finger-prick blood test. Those whose results are elevated will then be invited back for diagnostic tests.

The team expect to identify 1,000 people who have diabetes but who are unaware of it. These people will be followed up over the next five years to assess how far early detection has been able to prevent the complications of diabetes.

The study is supported by just under £1 million in grants from the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council and by £2 million in additional funding from the National Health Service through its Research and Development Programme.

The study has been welcomed by Professor Richard Himsworth, the Department of Health Portfolio Director for Research on Diabetes.

"The ADDITION study addresses some of the key questions about screening for diabetes. Who should be screened - everyone or just some people? Would patients benefit in the long term from earlier diagnosis ? Simple questions but the answers are very important because diabetes is a common disease," said Professor Himsworth.

Beck Lockwood | alfa

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections
17.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method
14.02.2017 | University of British Columbia

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>