Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Simple Push Filling Wins Crown In Battle Against Tooth Decay

The Hall Technique, which uses preformed metal crowns pushed onto teeth with no dental injections or drilling, is favoured over traditional “drill and fill” methods by the majority of children who received it, reveals research published in the online open access journal BMC Oral Health. Tooth decay can be slowed, or even stopped, when it is sealed into the tooth by the crown.

Dr Nicola Innes, who led the Scottish research team at Dundee Dental Hospital and School, explained, “There has been a lot of debate in the UK over the best method to tackle tooth decay in children’s molars. Preformed metal crowns are not widely used in Scotland as they’re not viewed as a realistic option by dentists. We found, however, that almost all the patients, parents and dentists in our study preferred the Hall Technique crowns and also children benefited from them.”

Traditionally, dentists “freeze” a decayed tooth with an injection in the child’s gum, and then drill away the decay, and fill the cavity with a metal filling. This method can be uncomfortable for the child. The Hall Technique, however, is simple. The decay is sealed into the tooth by the crown and, as sugars in the diet are unable to reach it, the decay slows or even stops. 132 children in Tayside, Scotland, had one decayed tooth filled traditionally, and another decayed tooth managed with the Hall Technique. 77% of the children, 83% of carers and 81% of dentists preferred the Hall Technique to traditional “drill and fill” methods. Dentists reported that 89% of the children showed no significant signs of discomfort with the Hall Technique, compared with 78% for the traditional fillings.

Around one in two children in Scotland has visible tooth decay at the age of 5. Most children have to accept toothache as part of normal everyday life. Two years after receiving the Hall Technique crown, however, the children’s dental health significantly improved, with less pain, abscesses and failed fillings than with the traditional “drill and fill” methods.

Dr Innes concluded “Children, parents and dentists prefer the Hall Technique. It allows dentists to achieve a filling with a high quality seal, which means we can safely leave decay in baby teeth, and not be forced to drill it away. Hall crowns will not suit every child, or every decayed tooth in a child’s mouth, but dentists may find it a useful treatment option for managing decay in children’s back teeth.”

Charlotte Webber | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>