Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Reducing kidney injury using a quality improvement method

30.07.2014

Using quality improvement measures in eight of the 10 hospitals in the Northern New England Cardiovascular Disease Study Group, researchers have found a way to reduce kidney injury in patients undergoing a procedure with contrast dye.

Currently, 7-15 percent of these patients who undergo a coronary stent procedure with contrast-dye end up with kidney injury, which can result in death or rapid decline in kidney function leading to temporary or permanent dialysis, says a study published in the July issue of Circulation Cardiovascular Quality Outcomes journal.

Previous to this study, based on quality improvement methods in the hospitals, little has been done to adopt evidence-based interventions though it has been a patient safety objective of the National Quality Forum.

While researchers looked specifically at patients in the cardiology catheterization lab, they believe the methods they developed over a six-year period to prevent kidney injury are generalizable to all of medicine and contrast procedures.

... more about:
»Cardiovascular »Health »Medicine »Quality »injury

"We believe that using a team-based approach and having teams at different medical centers in northern New England learn from one-another to provide the best care possible for their patients," said Jeremiah Brown of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice.

Brown and his colleagues found that using a quality improvement design and team coaching, they could reduce kidney injury by 20 percent among all patients and by 30 percent among patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease.

"Some of the most innovative ideas came from these teams and identified simple solutions to protect patients from kidney injury resulting from the contrast dye exposure," Brown said. "These included getting patients to self-hydrate with water before the procedure (8 glasses of water before and after the procedure), allow patients to drink fluids up to two hours before the procedure (whereas before they were "NPO" for up to 12 hours and came to the hospital dehydrated), training the doctors to use less contrast in the procedure (which is good for the patient and saves the hospital money), and creating stops in the system to delay a procedure if that patient had not received enough oral or intravenous fluids before the case (rather, they would delay the case until the patient received adequate fluids)."

Using a simple team-based approach, Brown and colleagues from 10 medical centers in northern New England prevented kidney injury in 1 out of every 5 patients undergoing a cardiac catheterization procedure.

"Our regional success was really about hospital teams talking and innovating with one another. Instead of competing with one another in similar health care markets, they shared their data, protocols, and ideas resulting in simple, homegrown, easy to do solutions that improved patient safety across the region," Brown said.

###

To view the abstract of the article in the journal Circulation Cardiovascular Quality Outcomes please go to http://circoutcomes.ahajournals.org/content/early/2014/07/29/CIRCOUTCOMES.114.000903.

Jeremiah R. Brown, PhD, MS, is an Assistant Professor of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice and Departments of Medicine and Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth.

The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice was founded in 1988 by Dr. John E. Wennberg as the Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences (CECS). Among its 25 years of accomplishments, it has established a new discipline and educational focus in the Evaluative Clinical Sciences, introduced and advanced the concept of shared decision-making for patients, demonstrated unwarranted variation in the practice and outcomes of medical treatment, developed the first comprehensive examination of US health care variations (The Dartmouth Atlas), and has shown that more health care is not necessarily better care.

Derik Hertel | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.dartmouth.edu

Further reports about: Cardiovascular Health Medicine Quality injury

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>