Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Recurring genital problems could be herpes

12.04.2011
A study of patients attending sexual health clinics in Gothenburg found that just four out of ten patients with genital herpes actually knew that they had the disorder. However, a third of those who did not realise that they had been infected reported typical symptoms at a follow-up visit, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

In her thesis Matilda Berntsson, a specialist in skin and sexually transmitted infections at the Frölunda Specialist Hospital’s skin clinic and researcher at the Sahlgrenska Academy, investigated the prevalence of genital herpes type 2 among patients attending sexual health clinics in Gothenburg. Her investigation included more than 1,000 patients, both male and female.

Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 infects the genital membranes before moving to the nerve ganglia alongside the spinal cord, where it remains for the rest of a patient’s life. Although many people who have been infected do not experience any discomfort, the virus can be activated and spread further through sexual contact. The disorder can also result in recurring genital problems.

“1,014 patients who attended sexual health clinics, the Sahlgrenska University Hospital skin clinic and the Sesam sexual health clinic were tested for herpes simplex virus type 2,” says Matilda Berntsson. “The presence of antibodies in the blood shows that a person is infected with the virus.”

The test results revealed that more than one in five women and one in ten men were infected with genital herpes type 2. Just four out of ten patients with herpes type 2 antibodies actually knew that they were infected. However, a third of those patients who did not know that they were infected reported typical symptoms in the form of recurring genital blisters and sores at a follow-up visit.

“The study reinforces our perception that genital herpes is common and that most people carrying it are unaware that they have it,” says Berntsson. “Non-specific recurring genital symptoms could be undiagnosed herpes, which can be detected with a simple test at the doctor’s.”

She therefore suggests that people with non-specific genital symptoms who are worried about genital herpes should see a doctor for an examination.

“If the symptoms and/or findings suggest herpes, there are good methods for testing for the disorder,” says Berntsson. “Pronounced symptoms can be treated with medicines that alleviate discomfort, and a daily preventative treatment can be given for longer periods where recurrences are frequent.”

HERPES
Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 spreads through sexual contact, and more than 500 million people worldwide have the disorder. In the West 10-30% of the population carry the virus, making it one of the most widespread sexually transmitted infections. The virus causes painful sores and blisters in the genital area and, in rare cases, serious infections in the brain and spinal cord. The infection is for life and there are currently no cures or vaccines for genital herpes. Herpes simplex virus type 1, which generally causes oral herpes/cold sores, can also infect the genitals, but tends not to result in recurring problems.

Title of thesis: Sexually Transmitted Infections: Serological, microbiological and microscopical aspects.

For more information, please contact:
Matilda Berntsson, researcher, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Sahlgrenska Academy and consultant, Frölunda Specialist Hospital skin clinic, mobile: +46 (0)733 774 996, e-mail: matilda.berntsson@vgregion.se

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://hdl.handle.net/2077/24094
http://www.gu.se

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubes
23.10.2017 | Johns Hopkins Medicine

nachricht Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
18.10.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Taming 'wild' electrons in graphene

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Mountain glaciers shrinking across the West

23.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubes

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>