Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Putting malaria on the SHELPH

26.02.2013
Experts have disabled a unique member of the signalling proteins which are essential for the development of the malaria parasite.

They have produced a mutant lacking the ancient bacterial Shewanella-like protein phosphatase known as SHLP1 (pronounced 'shelph').

This mutant is unable to complete its complex life cycle and is arrested in its development in the mosquito. The discovery could help in the design of new drugs to arrest the spread of this killer disease.

Targeting SHLP1

SHLP1 is critical to the cellular development of the malaria parasite. It can be found at every stage in the lifecycle of the malaria parasite and for the first time experts led by The University of Nottingham have analysed their biological function.

Dr Rita Tewari and her team in the Centre for Genetics and Genomics in the School of Biology have spent three years studying the phosphatase proteins that are important building blocks in the life cycle of the malaria parasite.

The findings of their latest study are published on 21st February 2013, in the journal Cell Reports.

Dr Tewari said: “SHLP1 is absent in humans and can be explored as an excellent target for malaria transmission control. Prevention of malaria transmission to and from the mosquito is vital in order to stop the devastating spread of malaria. Targeting SHLP1 could be an important step to achieve this goal.”

Although great strides have been made in reducing the number of deaths from malaria, half the world’s population remains at risk from the disease.

In 2010, 90 per cent of all malaria deaths occurred in Africa — mostly among children under the age of five.

Reducing the spread of malaria

Dr Tewari’s latest research has focused on the ancient bacterial Shewanella-like protein phosphatase (SHLP1) which is found only in bacteria, fungi, protists (organisms which paved the way for the evolution of early plants, animals and fungi) and plants.

The researchers, funded by the MRC and the Wellcome Trust, have discovered how SHLP1 controls development of the parasite at an essential stage of its life cycle. The parasite must move between human and mosquito in its quest to spread the disease.

It does this every time the mosquito bites. Removing this enzyme causes defects in structures vital for invading the mosquito gut — effectively stopping the mosquito from passing the disease on to another victim.

The research brought together expertise from Imperial College London, University of Oxford, the MRC National Institute for Medical Research and the University of Edinburgh.

Research continues

The work of Dr Tewari and her team is becoming increasingly important in the urgent effort to stop an infectious disease which kills 1.2 million people every year.

In 2009 Dr Tewari received an MRC New Investigator Award of nearly £500,000 to study the role of protein phosphatases during development in malaria parasite biology. She is currently a co-investigator on an MRC programme grant of £290,000 for her work on drug targets for malaria.

Dr Tewari has just received a further grant of nearly £600,000 from the MRC to study the regulation of cell division in the malaria parasite.

For up to the minute media alerts, follow us on Twitter or find out more on our Press Office blog

Notes to editors: The University of Nottinghamhas 42,000 students at award-winning campuses in the United Kingdom, China and Malaysia. It was ‘one of the first to embrace a truly international approach to higher education’, according to the Sunday Times University Guide 2013. It is also one of the most popular universities among graduate employers, one of the world’s greenest universities, and winner of the Times Higher Education Award for ‘Outstanding Contribution to Sustainable Development’. It is ranked in the UK's Top 10 and the World's Top 75 universities by the Shanghai Jiao Tong and the QS World Rankings.

More than 90 per cent of research at The University of Nottingham is of international quality, according to the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. The University aims to be recognised around the world for its signature contributions, especially in global food security, energy & sustainability, and health. The University won a Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education for its research into global food security.

Lindsay Brooke - Media Relations Manager
Email: lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)115 951 5751
ocation: University Park

Lindsay Brooke | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers track down cause of eye mobility disorder
17.04.2014 | University of Iowa

nachricht Life-style determines gut microbes
16.04.2014 | Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Siemens at the 2014 UIC ERTMS World Conference in Istanbul

01.04.2014 | Event News

AERA Meeting: German and US-American educational researchers in dialogue

28.03.2014 | Event News

WHS Regional Meeting: International experts address health challenges in Latin America

24.03.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

Synapses – stability in transformation

17.04.2014 | Life Sciences

Surprising material could play role in saving energy

17.04.2014 | Materials Sciences

Two new species of yellow-shouldered bats endemic to the Neotropics

17.04.2014 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>