Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Prostate cancer test improves prediction of disease course

16.06.2009
A new prostate cancer risk assessment test, developed by a UCSF team, gives patients and their doctors a better way of gauging long-term risks and pinpointing high risk cases.

According to UCSF study findings, published this week, the test proved accurate in predicting bone metastasis, prostate cancer-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality when localized prostate cancer is first diagnosed. The test is known as the UCSF Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment, or CAPRA.

The study, involving 10,627 men, is reported in the June 9 online edition of the “Journal of the National Cancer Institute.’’

“This test should help physicians and their patients predict the likely course of the individual’s disease,” said Matthew R. Cooperberg, MD, MPH, lead investigator of the study. Cooperberg, who helped develop the risk assessment test, is a prostate cancer specialist in the UCSF Department of Urology and the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

“In this study, we looked at the CAPRA score’s ability to predict mortality across multiple forms of treatment. It should help patients and clinicians decide which tumors need to be treated, and how aggressively. We also hope that in the research setting it can serve as a well-validated and consistent means of classifying men into low, intermediate and high risk groups.”

Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. This year, an estimated 192,280 men will be diagnosed with the disease, and 27,360 men will die from it, according to the American Cancer Society.

While prostate cancers are ultimately lethal, most men diagnosed actually die of other causes. Because of the highly variable nature of the disease, risk assessment to calculate the chances of cancer progression takes on heightened importance when a patient is diagnosed, said Cooperberg. At the time of diagnosis, only 5 percent of men have metastasis.

More than 100 risk assessment tests have been developed in recent years, but most are unable to predict long-term outcomes and are applicable to just one form of treatment, rather than providing information relevant to multiple treatment modalities.

Because of these limitations, UCSF developed the CAPRA test. It calculates patient risk through five factors: age at diagnosis, Gleason score (a measure of how aggressive the cancer cells appear under the microscope), PSA score (prostate-specific antigen level in the blood), percentage of biopsy scores that test positive for cancer, and clinical tumor stage based on digital exam of the prostate and/or ultrasound.

“The goal of risk assessment is to find the patients at high risk of mortality and treat them aggressively, and for others to guide their treatment or surveillance plan accordingly,’’ said Cooperberg.

The CAPRA test has been independently validated in three studies as being accurate and consistent in predicting pathological and biochemical outcomes after radical prostatectomy (surgery to remove the prostate gland).

The UCSF study was intended to measure the accuracy of CAPRA for its ability to predict metastasis or mortality.

The study looked at men from the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE). A national disease registry launched by UCSF in 1995, it tracks prostate cancer patients at 40 primarily community-based urology practices across the United States.

The patients in the study had undergone radical prostatectomy, radiation therapy, androgen deprivation therapy (hormone therapy), or watchful waiting.

Nearly 3 percent (311) of the men developed bone metastases, 2.4 percent (251) died of prostate cancer, and 14.9 percent (1,582) died of other causes.

The CAPRA score accurately predicted all three outcomes.

The study determined that with each point increase in CAPRA score, the risk of death from prostate cancer increases 39 percent; with each two-point increase in score, risk roughly doubles. The tool can predict risk up to 10 years.

“Given its high degree of accuracy and ease of calculation, the CAPRA score may prove an increasingly valuable tool for risk stratification in both the clinical practice and the research setting,’’ wrote the study authors.

Co-authors of the study were Jeanette M. Broering, RN, MS, MPH, director of data quality assurance in the UCSF Department of Urology, and Peter R. Carroll, MD, MPH, chair of the UCSF Department of Urology and director of strategic planning and clinical services at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center.

UCSF is a leading university dedicated to promoting health worldwide through advanced biomedical research, graduate-level education in the life sciences and health professions, and excellence in patient care.

Elizabeth Fernandez | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ucsf.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airways
28.06.2017 | University of Iowa Health Care

nachricht Mice provide insight into genetics of autism spectrum disorders
28.06.2017 | University of California - Davis

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

High conductive foils enabling large area lighting

29.06.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Designed proteins to treat muscular dystrophy

29.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Climate Fluctuations & Non-equilibrium Statistical Mechanics: An Interdisciplinary Dialog

29.06.2017 | Seminars Workshops

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>