Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy live into their 90s

14.11.2011
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is consistent with survival to normal life expectancy, including particularly advanced age into the tenth decade of life, with demise ultimately largely unrelated to this disease, according to a study being presented Nov. 13 at the American Heart Association (AHA) scientific sessions in Orlando, Fla.

HCM is the most common cause of sudden death in the young, but survival to a particularly advanced age is less well understood.

"In the past, this disease has been associated with a grim prognosis, due to the deadly nature in young people, but we have learned through this analysis that those assumptions were inaccurate," said the study's lead author Barry J. Maron, MD, director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation. "We are continuing to learn about this unique disease state."

In the study, Maron and colleagues assessed the prevalence, clinical features and demographics of HCM patients surviving to the age of 90 years or older through an interrogation of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation's HCM Center database.

Of the 1,297 HCM patients, 26 had achieved the age of at least 90 years; 69 percent were women. The age at which HCM was diagnosed ranged from 61 to 92 years, with disease recognition under fortuitous circumstances by detection of a heart murmur or during family screening (six patients), or after onset of new symptoms (20 patients).

At the most recent evaluation (or death) patients were 90.0 to 96.7 years of age, with six presently alive at 90 to 96 years of age. Maron noted that HCM did not appear to be the primary cause of demise in any patient.

HCM-related complications occurred in18 patients, including heart failure symptoms, atrial fibrillation and non-fatal embolic stroke. Although no patient died suddenly, 13 still carried conventional HCM markers of risk.

Interestingly, a greater proportion of these HCM patients reached the age 90 years of older (2 percent) than expected in the general population (0.8 percent).

"We showed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy—the most common cause of death among young people—is associated not only with normal life, but also extended longevity," Maron said. "These findings underscore a principle of the disease that has been falsely assumed; namely, that this disease will lead to an early demise in all patients."

Finally, these data can reassure mainly patients who are diagnosed with HCM that their lives will not necessarily be cut short, Maron concluded.

Minneapolis Heart Institute®

The Minneapolis Heart Institute® is recognized internationally as one of the world's leading providers of heart and vascular care. This state-of-the-art facility combines the finest in personalized patient care with sophisticated technology in a unique, family-oriented environment. The Institute's programs, a number of which are conducted in conjunction with Abbott Northwestern Hospital, address the full range of heart and vascular health needs: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation

The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation is dedicated to creating a world without heart disease through groundbreaking clinical research and innovative education programs. MHIF's mission is to promote and improve cardiovascular health, quality of life and longevity for all.

Kristin Wincek | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mhif.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brain
19.06.2018 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

nachricht Overdosing on Calcium
19.06.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures

20.06.2018 | Information Technology

Electron sandwich doubles thermoelectric performance

20.06.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Intelligent maps will help robots navigate in your home

20.06.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>