Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Optimized Radiation for Prostate Cancer Therapy

16.10.2008
The determination of the precise anatomical location of a tumor is the prerequisite for setting optimal parameters for radiation treatment of prostate cancer.

This approach guarantees that the ionizing radiation only destroys tumorous cells and does not affect other organs in the vicinity of the prostate. In a cooperative study with Innsbruck Medical University and the East-Vienna Center of Social Medicine, two physicists of Vienna University of Technology (TU), evaluated the mean deviation of radiation parameters for prostate cancers and compared various sources of radiation.

Movement inaccuracies of up to two centimeters may occur in prostate radiation. “During the radiation treatment, patients have to lie on a table for some 20 minutes without moving. Over time, the muscles relax and the pelvis drops. As a consequence, the radiation may focus on the bladder or other organs. In our calculations, we concentrated on the precision of localizing the prostate and on improvement potentials in treatment,” explained Karin Poljanc, Assistant Professor at the Atomic Institute of Austrian Universities.

In a study conducted in cooperation with SMZ Ost (East-Vienna Center of Social Medicine, Danube Hospital), Poljanc and her research associates, Tanja Futschek and Leila Teymournia, used a number of ultrasound examinations that allowed for a precise localization of the patients’ organs from the outside. In a next step, the scientists analyzed the positioning of 60 patients, and evaluated the deviation of radiation in various spatial directions, such as to the right or left, and upward or downward (using 420 radiation plans for thirty patients). While it takes more time, an ultrasound system makes the shifts in position visible and traceable. If the deviation exceeds 0.8 cm, the radiology technicians are responsible for returning the patient to the correct position to ensure that the radiation only targets the specified area. In the subsequent study phase, Poljanc and her group calculated normal tissue compensation rates and the probability of tumor control. “This provides us with an overview of the probability that the tumor is targeted directly and the probability of side effects for individual patients,” notes Poljanc. These approaches serve as forecasts and provide clues for the likelihood of healing.

After a study period of some 2.5 years, with generous sponsorship of the Anniversary Fund of the Austrian National Bank, the scientists were able to implement the calculated average positioning inaccuracies in a radiation planning system. Sums up Leila Teymournia: “Depending on the calculation model used, the normal tissue compensation rate can vary widely in the results. While the use of Model A may yield a negligible complication rate, the same process calculated with Model B shows a deviation of up to 40 percent.” Due to the absence of biological parameters, major discrepancies may result with different models. Nevertheless, the results of calculations can provide physicians with data for improving patient positioning accuracy and therefore, and improvement of treatment success.

As part of their study of different radiation sources, Karin Poljanc, Tanja Futschek, and Leila Teymournia found that localization aids, such as ultrasound systems, are indispensable for accurate proton therapy of prostate carcinomas. In most cases, this combination leads to therapy results with a high level of tissue preservation.

The future establishment of the cancer research and therapy center “Med-AUSTRON” in Wiener Neustadt will implement such a treatment method in Austria.

Daniela Hallegger | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tuwien.ac.at/pr
http://www.tuwien.ac.at/aktuelles/news_detail/article/5210/

Further reports about: Prostate Cancer Therapy Radiation prostate radiation treatment therapy

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>