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Nuclear Medicine Therapy Increases Survival for Patients with Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases

07.11.2013
For patients who fail to respond to current first-line and second-line treatments for colorectal cancer liver metastases (also known as salvage patients), radioembolization with Y-90 microspheres could extend survival according to new research published in the November issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

A systematic review conducted by researchers showed that approximately 50 percent of salvage patients have an overall survival of more than 12 months after this nuclear medicine therapy.

Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed type of cancer worldwide in men and the second in women, and it is also the third most common cause of death. In approximately 50 percent of patients, metastases to the liver are present at diagnosis or during follow-up, which account for a large portion of morbidity and mortality in patients.

A structured review was performed by researchers to gather all available evidence on radioembolization for the specific group of patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases. “Although quite some reviews are printed on the subject of radioembolization, we felt that a structured and comprehensive review on survival and response data for these patients was lacking,” said Charlotte E.N.M. Rosenbaum, PhD, lead author of the study “Radioembolization for Treatment of Salvage Patients with Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: A Systemic Review.”

Researchers reviewed a total of 13 articles on Y-90 radioembolization as a monotherapy and 13 articles on Y-90 radioembolization as a combined with chemotherapy. Among the studies, disease control rates (i.e., complete response, partial response and stable disease) ranged from 29-90 percent in the monotherapy studies, which involved 901 patients. In the studies in which Y-90 radioembolization was combined with chemotherapy, involving 472 patients, disease control rates ranged from 59-100 percent.

“From the studies included in this systematic review, survival proportions of approximately 50 percent were found. Therefore, in this group of salvagecolorectal cancer liver metastases patients who otherwise have no regular treatment options and a life expectancy of less than six months, Y-90 radioembolization seems to be a hopeful treatment option,” noted Rosenbaum.

She continued, “Our paper shows all published data on this subject from the first randomized trial onwards. Furthermore, we have determined 12-month survival proportions for all included articles to provide a better overview and to better allow for comparisons. Finally, this overview of the literature shows which topics have not been the focus of much research and may thus be interesting for further work.”

Authors of the article “Radioembolization for Treatment of Salvage Patients with Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: A Systemic Review”include Charlotte E.N.M. Rosenbaum, Helena M Verkooijen, Marnix G.E.H. Lam, Maarten L.J. Smits, Tom van Seeters, Malou A. Vermoolen and Maurice A.A.J. van den Bosch, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands; and Miriam Koopman, Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Please visit the SNMMI Newsroom to view the PDF of the study, including images, and more information about molecular imaging and personalized medicine. To schedule an interview with the researchers, please contact Susan Martonik at (703) 652-6773 or smartonik@snmmi.org. Current and past issues of The Journal of Nuclear Medicinecan be found online at http://jnm.snmjournals.org.

About the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, a vital element of today’s medical practice that adds an additional dimension to diagnosis, changing the way common and devastating diseases are understood and treated and helping provide patients with the best health care possible.

SNMMI’s more than 18,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging and therapy research and practice. For more information, visit www.snmmi.org.

Susan Martonik | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.snmmi.org

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