Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Novel methods for improved breast cancer survival

22.02.2011
A quarter of all women who suffer from breast cancer are at risk of metastasis – a recurrence of the cancer.

In recent years, researchers at Lund University, Sweden, have developed a technique that can identify in advance which patients belong to this risk group. Within the next two years the method will be tested in Swedish hospitals. In the future, the technique may also be used in hospitals in other countries.

This, together with other research within the Breast Cancer Initiative, as the project is called, has been awarded SEK 25 million from the Swedish innovation agency Vinnova. The project is part of the interdisciplinary cancer centre Create Health, where immunologists, tumour biologists, nanotechnologists, bioinformaticians and cancer researchers work together.

“This campaign means that our research can benefit patients earlier”, comments Carl Borrebaeck, Professor of Immunotechnology at Lund University and programme director for Create Health.

He and his colleagues aim to significantly shorten the waiting times for test results and information about continued treatment. The idea is to build a diagnostic clinic next to the operating theatre. The tumour can then be analysed while the patient is still on the operating table and the surgeon, oncologist and pathologist can together make a diagnosis and decide on the right treatment.

The research is based on a unique technique developed by the researchers in Lund. By analysing patterns of biomarkers, or protein molecules, in the blood, it is possible to obtain information about what type of cancer the patient has and what the prognosis is.

“We also map the tumour cells’ genome. Using this map, we can find out how responses to different types of treatment may relate to specific genes. This knowledge could be of great help in selecting the right treatment”, says Carl Borrebaeck.

The Create Health group is also in the process of developing a breast cancer index. Blood and tissue samples from patients with breast tumours are analysed on both protein and gene level and a unique ‘fingerprint’ of each tumour is obtained.

“Our aim is to analyse all the tumours in southern Sweden. This collection of samples also improves the collaboration between clinicians and researchers, as well as the chances to be able to quickly implement our research results in a clinical setting”, emphasises Carsten Rose, Professor of Oncology and head of division at Skåne University Hospital.

When it comes to the work on early identification of which patients are at risk of metastasis, the research has come a long way and has now entered its final stage.

“Currently, all women receive the same harsh treatment. However, with our technique it is possible to select which patients actually need it, and therefore also which only need a significantly milder treatment. The improved prognosis can reduce side-effects and unnecessary suffering for the patient, as well as saving a lot of money”, says Carsten Rose.

The Breast Cancer Initiative is part of Create Health, which comprises projects run by professors Åke Borg (oncology), Peter James (proteomics), Carl Borrebaeck (cancer immunology) and Carsten Rose (oncology).

For more information, please contact Carl Borrebaeck, Professor of Immunotechnology at Lund University, +46 46 222 96 13, +46 708 21 83 30, Carl.Borrebaeck@rektor.lu.se; Carsten Rose, Professor of Oncology and head of division at Skåne University Hospital, +46 46 17 69 20, +46 702 577509, Carsten.Rose@skane.se; Åke Borg, Professor of Oncology at Lund University, +46 46 177502, Ake.Borg@med.lu.se; Peter James, Professor of Proteomics at Lund University, +46 46 222 1496, +46 702 477960, Peter.James@immun.lth.se.

Megan Grindlay | idw
Further information:
http://www.createhealth.lth.se

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht 'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers
16.02.2018 | National University of Science and Technology MISIS

nachricht New process allows tailor-made malaria research
16.02.2018 | Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>