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Non-medical treatment may rapidly relieve severe IBS symptoms

27.04.2010
A significant proportion of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients treated with cognitive behavior therapy have a positive response within four weeks of treatment, according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute.

"Patients who quickly achieve treatment gains — for example, IBS symptom relief — may be spared the cost and inconvenience of follow-up care of little therapeutic value. This scenario may lead to the development of self-guided treatments based on multimedia technology, such as Web, DVD and smartphone, and free up trained clinicians to focus on more severely affected patients," said Jeffrey M. Lackner, PsyD, of the University at Buffalo, SUNY, and lead author of the study.

"Conversely, patients who do not respond within a set number of sessions early on could be immediately identified and triaged or 'stepped up' to potentially more powerful treatment(s) rather than bearing the cost, demoralization and frustration that comes with treatment failure."

In a study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, doctors investigated whether patients who achieved rapid, substantial and sustained symptom improvements relatively early in treatment (by week four) — called "rapid responders" — maintain treatment gains, compared with non-rapid responders. A total of 71 patients were randomly assigned to undergo 10 weekly, one-hour sessions of cognitive behavior therapy or four, one-hour cognitive behavior therapy sessions over 10 weeks. Rapid responders were classified as patients who reported adequate relief of pain, adequate relief of bowel symptoms and a decrease in total IBS severity scores of greater than or equal to 50 by week four.

Of patients undergoing cognitive behavior therapy, 30 percent were rapid responders, of whom 90 percent to 95 percent maintained gains at the immediate and three-month follow-up examinations. Although the rapid responders reported more severe IBS symptoms at baseline, they achieved more substantial, sustained IBS symptom reduction than non-rapid responders. Both dosages of cognitive behavior therapy had comparable rates of rapid responders.

"We don't believe the rapidity of response is simply because rapid responders had less severe IBS when they began treatment. In fact, rapid responders had more severe IBS symptoms and quality of life impairment than other patients. Nor did we find evidence to support the notion that patients responded more rapidly just because they were less distressed," added Dr. Lackner. "Further research is needed to clarify whether rapid responders maintain treatment response longer term and, if so, what drives the durability of treatment response."

The great majority of rapid responders (92 percent) showed lasting benefit that persisted three months after treatment ended with no evidence of deterioration. This suggests that rapid response is a relatively robust, clinically meaningful and enduring clinical phenomenon. In fact, rapid responders maintained or continued to improve on the gains made in treatment.

IBS is a common disorder of the intestines that leads to abdominal pain or discomfort and changes in bowel habits. Some people with IBS have constipation (difficult or infrequent bowel movements), others have diarrhea (frequent, loose stools), while some people experience both. Sometimes the person with IBS has a sudden urge to move the bowels. To learn more about IBS, visit the patient center on the AGA Web site at www.gastro.org/patient.

About the AGA Institute

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to include 17,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. www.gastro.org.

About Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology

The mission of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology is to provide readers with a broad spectrum of themes in clinical gastroenterology and hepatology. This monthly peer-reviewed journal includes original articles as well as scholarly reviews, with the goal that all articles published will be immediately relevant to the practice of gastroenterology and hepatology. For more information, visit www.cghjournal.org.

Follow us on Twitter @AmerGastroAssn. Become an AGA fan on Facebook.

Alissa J. Cruz | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.gastro.org

Further reports about: AGA Gastroenterological Gastroenterology Hepatology IBS

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