Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Marker may predict response to ipilimumab in advanced melanoma

04.02.2014
Among patients with advanced melanoma, presence of higher levels of the protein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in blood was associated with poor response to treatment with the immunotherapy ipilimumab, according to a study published in Cancer Immunology Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The study suggests combining immunotherapy with VEGF inhibitors, also known as angiogenesis inhibitors, may be a potential option for these patients.

The immune-checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab works by boosting the body's immune system to combat melanoma. VEGF is a protein that promotes new blood vessel formation and growth, a process called angiogenesis, thus providing nutrients to the growing tumor. The study found that among patients who had late-stage melanoma, those who had high levels of VEGF in their blood prior to treatment with ipilimumab had decreased clinical benefit, poor overall survival outcomes, and were 60 percent more likely to die of their disease, compared with those who had lower levels of VEGF.

"VEGF is known to suppress the maturation of immune cells and their antitumor responses, and evidence points toward an association between high serum VEGF levels and poor prognosis in melanoma patients," said F. Stephen Hodi, M.D., director of the Melanoma Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Mass. "VEGF has also been shown to be a potential biomarker for other immunotherapies, thus it seemed logical to test the ability of VEGF to predict responses to ipilimumab.

"We found that VEGF may actually hinder some of the effects of the immune-checkpoint inhibitor," Hodi added. "We are beginning to better define predictive biomarkers for immune-checkpoint blockers, specifically ipilimumab. Our study further suggests that there is a potential interaction existing between the biology of angiogenesis and immune-checkpoint blockade."

Hodi and colleagues conducted retrospective analyses of blood samples collected from 176 patients with metastatic melanoma, before and after they were treated with ipilimumab, at Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Patients were 16 to 91 years old, and the majority of them had stage 4 disease.

VEGF levels in patients' blood ranged from 0.1 to 894.4 picograms per milliliter (pg/ml). The investigators determined 43 pg/ml to be the cutoff value, and evaluated patient responses to treatment as those whose pretreatment VEGF levels were greater than (VEGF-high) or less than (VEGF-low) the cutoff value.

They found that at 24 weeks after starting ipilimumab treatment, 41 percent of the VEGF-low patients experienced clinical benefit, including partial or complete treatment responses; only 23 percent of the VEGF-high patients experienced a clinical benefit.

The median overall survival for VEGF-low patients was 12.9 months, compared with 6.6 months for VEGF-high patients.

The researchers found that while pretreatment VEGF levels had the potential to predict treatment outcomes, changes in VEGF levels during treatment were not linked to treatment outcomes.

"It may be worthwhile to investigate combining immune-checkpoint inhibitors and angiogenesis inhibitors in advanced melanoma with high serum VEGF levels," said Hodi. His team has initiated a randomized clinical trial to test ipilimumab in combination with bevacizumab, an angiogenesis inhibitor, in patients with advanced melanoma.

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Hodi has declared no conflicts of interest.

Follow the AACR on Twitter: @AACR

Follow the AACR on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/aacr.org

About the American Association for Cancer Research

Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world's oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer. AACR membership includes more than 34,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and cancer advocates residing in more than 90 countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise of the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, biology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by annually convening more than 20 conferences and educational workshops, the largest of which is the AACR Annual Meeting with more than 18,000 attendees. In addition, the AACR publishes eight peer-reviewed scientific journals and a magazine for cancer survivors, patients, and their caregivers. The AACR funds meritorious research directly as well as in cooperation with numerous cancer organizations. As the scientific partner of Stand Up To Cancer, the AACR provides expert peer review, grants administration, and scientific oversight of team science and individual grants in cancer research that have the potential for near-term patient benefit. The AACR actively communicates with legislators and policymakers about the value of cancer research and related biomedical science in saving lives from cancer. For more information about the AACR, visit http://www.AACR.org.

To interview F. Stephen Hodi, contact Teresa Herbert at teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu or 617-632-5653. For other inquiries, contact Jeremy Moore at jeremy.moore@aacr.org or 215-446-7109.

Jeremy Moore | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aacr.org

Further reports about: AACR Cancer VEGF-high VEGF-low angiogenesis inhibitors blood sample immune cell

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies
29.07.2015 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

nachricht It don't mean a thing if the brain ain't got that swing
28.07.2015 | University of California - Berkeley

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Superfast fluorescence sets new speed record

Plasmonic device has speed and efficiency to serve optical computers

Researchers have developed an ultrafast light-emitting device that can flip on and off 90 billion times a second and could form the basis of optical computing.

Im Focus: Unlocking the rice immune system

Joint BioEnergy Institute study identifies bacterial protein that is key to protecting rice against bacterial blight

A bacterial signal that when recognized by rice plants enables the plants to resist a devastating blight disease has been identified by a multi-national team...

Im Focus: Smarter window materials can control light and energy

Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin are one step closer to delivering smart windows with a new level of energy efficiency, engineering materials that allow windows to reveal light without transferring heat and, conversely, to block light while allowing heat transmission, as described in two new research papers.

By allowing indoor occupants to more precisely control the energy and sunlight passing through a window, the new materials could significantly reduce costs for...

Im Focus: Simulations lead to design of near-frictionless material

Argonne scientists used Mira to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code.

While reviewing the simulation results of a promising new lubricant material, Argonne researcher Sanket Deshmukh stumbled upon a phenomenon that had never been...

Im Focus: NASA satellite camera provides 'EPIC' view of Earth

A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away.

The color images of Earth from NASA's Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) are generated by combining three separate images to create a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Euro Bio-inspired - International Conference and Exhibition on Bio-inspired Materials

23.07.2015 | Event News

Clash of Realities – International Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

10.07.2015 | Event News

World Conference on Regenerative Medicine in Leipzig: Last chance to submit abstracts until 2 July

25.06.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

A New Litmus Test for Chaos?

29.07.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

New Computer Model Could Explain how Simple Molecules Took First Step Toward Life

29.07.2015 | Life Sciences

New ERC calls published under Horizon 2020

29.07.2015 | Awards Funding

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>