Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Lung societies unveil new international classification of lung adenocarcinoma

01.02.2011
First revision since 2004 takes a multidisciplinary approach, includes newest research

Three of the world's top lung associations have published a new international multidisciplinary classification of lung adenocarcinoma, the first revision to the classification in six years.

The new classification is published in the February edition of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC).

"With the many rapid advances in lung adenocarcinoma affecting clinical, radiologic, pathologic, molecular and surgical aspects of this cancer, it was necessary to develop a new classification using an international multidisciplinary consensus committee," said Dr. William Travis, attending thoracic pathologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. "Since lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide and adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic subtype in most countries, this classification addresses a major public health problem."

The IASLC was the primary sponsor of the project, which was performed with support and scientific oversight from the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society. An international core panel of experts representing the three organizations was formed to conduct the review; it included oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists and thoracic surgeons.

Unlike previous classifications published by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1967, 1981 and 1999, which were written primarily by pathologists for pathologists, the new classification takes into account advances across diverse specialties in the understanding of lung adenocarcinoma. Although the 2004 revision introduced relevant genetics and clinical information, the new classification is the first to be based on an integrated multidisciplinary platform.

"All previous WHO classifications have been developed by pathologists with little input from other specialties," Travis said.

One of the key new recommendations is that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing be performed for patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, due to the predictive benefit for response rate and progression-free survival for mutation-positive patients who are treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

A completely new aspect of this classification, which was not addressed in previous WHO classifications, is a section that addresses diagnosis and classification of non-small cell carcinoma in small biopsies and cytology, Travis said. "This is important because 70% of lung cancers present in advanced stages," Travis said. "This section not only provides new criteria for diagnosis of adenocarcinoma versus squamous cell carcinoma that includes use of special stains in difficult cases, but it also stresses the importance of preserving tissue for molecular studies."

There are three major clinical reasons why it is important for pathologists to distinguish adenocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma, particularly in advanced lung cancer:

adenocarcinoma or unspecified NSCLC should be tested for EGFR mutations, which would indicate responsiveness to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors;
patients with adenocarcinoma or unspecified NSCLC respond better to pemetrexed therapy than those with squamous cell carcinoma;

potential life-threatening hemorrhage may occur in patients with squamous cell carcinoma who receive bevacizumab.

The new classification recommends discontinuing use of the term bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) as tumors previously classified under this term fall into five different places in the new classification.

New concepts of "adenocarcinoma in situ" and "minimally invasive adenocarcinoma" were introduced to define patients who should have 100% or near 100% disease-free survival, respectively.

About the Journal of Thoracic Oncology:

The Journal of Thoracic Oncology (JTO) is the official monthly journal of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). It is a prized resource for medical specialists and scientists who focus on the detection, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. It emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach, including original research (clinical trials and translational or basic research), reviews and opinion pieces.

To find out more about the JTO please visit journals.lww.com. To learn more about the IASLC please visit iaslc.org.

Renée McGaw | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ucdenver.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New insights into the ancestors of all complex life

29.05.2017 | Earth Sciences

New photocatalyst speeds up the conversion of carbon dioxide into chemical resources

29.05.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA's SDO sees partial eclipse in space

29.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>