Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

LCSB coordinates European project on Parkinson’s research

03.12.2015

The Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg is coordinating an EU project for research into new active compounds against Parkinson’s disease (PD). SysMedPD (Systems Medicine of Mitochondrial Parkinson’s Disease) is the name of the project that just started with the involvement of five universities and three companies from Luxembourg, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands and UK. The European Union is funding the researchers of this consortium with a total of 5.9 million euros.

With this funding, they will be developing novel techniques by which to identify and research into active compounds against PD. They will furthermore be advancing drug candidates towards their medical application.


From left: Prof. Jens Schwamborn (head of the LCSB group Development and Cell Biology), Prof. Rudi Balling (LCSB director and coordinator of SysMedPD) und Dr Ronan Fleming (Systems Biochemist

scienceRELATIONS / Universität Luxemburg

“Universities and biopharmaceutical companies complement each other’s expertise ideally in SysMedPD,” says Prof. Rudi Balling, LCSB director and coordinator of SysMedPD. “This creates optimal conditions in which to progress a good deal further in developing diagnoses and therapies for Parkinson’s disease.”

Parkinson’s disease is a gradually progressive disease of human nerve tissue, resulting among other things in muscle tremors and muscle rigidity. The mitochondria of nerve cells are often causally involved in the onset – mitochondria being the power plants of cells, in which biochemical reactions provide energy for cellular metabolic processes.

“We estimate that in about ten to twenty percent of all Parkinson’s patients, their mitochondria do not function properly,” says senior LCSB scientist Dr Ronan Fleming, who is significantly involved in the conception and coordination of SysMedPD. “In order to better diagnose, heal or at least effectively curb the progression of Parkinson’s disease, we must understand this dysfunction of mitochondria in detail.”

The researchers within SysMedPD are first concentrating on such patterns of PD in which the mitochondria are damaged by mutations in individual genes. “Later, the results can then be carried over to patient groups in which multiple genes and environmental factors are involved in the onset of PD,” adds Dr Fleming.

The SysMedPD consortium will tackle this task with different approaches: “At the LCSB, we place emphasis on developing new, computational models by which we can better depict the processes going on inside mitochondria,” Ronan Fleming says. Prof. Jens Schwamborn, head of the LCSB group Development and Cell Biology, describes a complementary approach: “We must verify any computational predictions using experiments. Therefore, in the scope of this EU project, we will also employ advanced cellular models, where skin samples obtained from Parkinson’s disease patients are reprogrammed into living human nerve cells.”

To ensure the research results obtained within SysMedPD are translated into application as quickly as possible, the consortium also has biopharmaceutical companies on board. Their areas of involvement are test development for new active compounds and identification of active compounds.

“The project is organised such that the insights that we and the other academic partners gain will complement those of the companies involved very well,” says Prof. Rudi Balling. “With this close connection between public and private research, we can ensure the EU funding, firstly, is employed optimally in the interest of the PD patients and, secondly, will generate economic stimuli. These are important objectives of the EU that we will fulfil here.”

The SysMedPD partners:
- Germany: University of Lübeck (Prof. Christine Klein), EURICE – European Research and Project Office GmbH (Corinna Hahn)
- Ireland: Maynooth University (Dr Niall Finnerty)
- Luxembourg: University of Luxembourg (Prof. Rudi Balling, Dr Ronan Fleming, Prof. Jens Schwamborn)
- Netherlands: Leiden University (Prof. Thomas Hankemeier), Khondrion BV (Prof. Jan Smeitink), Mimetas BV (Dr Paul Vulto)
- Great Britain: University College London (Prof. Anthony Schapira)

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni.lu/lcsb - Homepage of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine

Britta Schlüter | Universität Luxemburg - Université du Luxembourg

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>