Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Johns Hopkins team finds new way to attack TB

25.03.2010
Suspecting that a particular protein in tuberculosis was likely to be vital to the bacteria's survival, Johns Hopkins scientists screened 175,000 small chemical compounds and identified a potent class of compounds that selectively slows down this protein's activity and, in a test tube, blocks TB growth, demonstrating that the protein is indeed a vulnerable target.

This class of chemical compounds attacks TB by inhibiting methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP), an essential enzyme found in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans, and that clearly has been conserved throughout evolution because of its important task of ensuring the proper manufacture of proteins.

"The MetAP inhibitors we discovered are hits, or leads in the sense that they provide a framework — a starting point — for the future development of an anti-TB drug," says Jun O. Liu, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The research appears in the January 29 edition of Chemistry & Biology.

The scientists cautioned that although the MetAP inhibitors prevent TB growth in test tubes, they have a long way to go before being declared safe and effective to treat TB patients. To understand how the MetAP inhibitors work, Liu suggests thinking of proteins as a strand of pearls folded in unique 3-D shapes, with each bead representing a protein building block, or amino acid. Invariably, the first bead, or amino acid, in every string, whether human or bacterial protein, is a methionine. The methionine ultimately needs to be removed in order for the protein to mature and fold correctly. Its removal is the job of enzymes called methionine aminopeptidases, or MetAPs.

"If you knock out this enzyme in TB bacteria, the bacteria will not survive," Liu says. "We expected that would happen, and confirmed it by manipulating how much enzyme is expressed to see what happens to the sensitivity of the bacteria when inhibitors are present."

What caught the team by surprise, however, was finding a potent class of compounds (called 2,3-dichloro-1, 4-naphthoquinone) that inhibits this enzyme. That discovery involved the use of large-scale, high-throughput screening of 175,000 compounds and measuring the potencies of a dozen related hits against the enzyme.

The final experiment by the team was to test the MetAP inhibitors on TB bacteria in culture to see if it had any effect on bacteria growth.

"Judging from potency, a MetAP inhibibitor alone probably won't wipe out TB," Liu says. "TB is so hard to treat that the standard therapy involves a cocktail of multiple drugs; no single compound is powerful enough. Our hope is that someday an inhibitor of MetAP will become a new component to enhance the existing therapy."

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

In addition to Liu, authors of this paper are Omonike Olaleye, Tirumalai R. Raghunand, Shridhar Bhat, Sandeep Tyagi, Gyanu Lamichhane, Peihua Gu, Jiangbing Zhou, Ying Zhang, Jacques Grosset, and William R. Bishai, all of Johns Hopkins.

Maryalice Yakutchik | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jhmi.edu

Further reports about: MetAP MetAP inhibitors TB TB bacteria amino acid bacteria methionine aminopeptidase

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>