Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


New insights contradict promising Alzheimer's research

Approximately a year ago, the leading journal Science published an article about bexarotene as a potential Alzheimer’s drug.

A significant breakthrough and an important starting point for further Alzheimer’s research. The research group of Bart De Strooper – Alzheimer’s researcher at VIB and KU Leuven – in collaboration with the group of Rudi D’Hooge – KU Leuven – and scientists at Janssen Pharmaceutica, Beerse, also tested this candidate drug in various Alzheimer’s animal test models. Their results were different, as were those of two American study groups. Therefore, they have recommended in a “technical comment” in Science that bexarotene should not be tested on patients.

Bart De Strooper (Department Director VIB/KU Leuven): “Science is a learning process and one learns by trial and error and by starting again and correcting mistakes. Therefore, it is logical that conclusions from scientific research – even in prestigious journals – need to be re-evaluated from time to time. If results cannot be reproduced, it is very important that this is mentioned so that other scientists can also determine the value of a publication (reproducible science is the only true science). This is the only way that we can learn from our mistakes and hopefully one day develop a drug.”

Jo Bury (Managing Director VIB): “VIB places great value on thorough checks and balances of scientific results. This is the most important condition for leading research that could benefit our society. It is good news that Science is also prepared to publish negative results.”

Scientific research, a process of ups and downs
Scientific findings do not simply fall into someone’s lap; they are the result of years of dogged research. The icing on the cake is a publication in a scientific journal, as this is the way that scientists announce their results to the world. Before a publication is accepted, a journal will submit the document to a panel of leading scientists in that field of research. The publication is only given the go-ahead following a positive evaluation by these experts.
Built-in control mechanisms
Is this an absolute guarantee? Unfortunately not.
Fellow scientists try to reproduce results. They are usually successful, but sometimes similar experiments lead to different results. And this needs to be reported and examined in more detail. These built-in control mechanisms in the scientific process are therefore very important. It is a normal part of the scientific process. Scientific journals also sometimes offer scientists the opportunity to comment on certain publications after they have been published. The journal Science does this in the form of “technical comments”. This is often the source of more extensive research.
New insights sometimes invalidate existing theories
Scientists want to get to the bottom of phenomena, usually with a certain hypothesis in mind. Research leads to new knowledge and insights, which results in refinement of the existing theories. However, sometimes this results in a completely new theory and the rejection of an existing theory. The history of science is littered with examples of this: think of Copernicus who was the first to assert that the sun – and not the earth – is the centre of our solar system. The Flemish contribution to Science is an excellent example of the self-monitoring process in the scientific world.
Relevant publication
"Technical comment on ApoE-Directed Therapeutics Rapidly Clear b-Amyloid and Reverse Deficits in AD Mouse Models”, Ina Tesseur et al., Science 2013

Kris Van der Beken | EurekAlert!
Further information:

Further reports about: Alzheimer Alzheimer’s drug Science TV VIB scientific research

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease
26.10.2016 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Gene therapy shows promise for treating Niemann-Pick disease type C1

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Solid progress in carbon capture

27.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>