Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New insights contradict promising Alzheimer's research

24.05.2013
Approximately a year ago, the leading journal Science published an article about bexarotene as a potential Alzheimer’s drug.

A significant breakthrough and an important starting point for further Alzheimer’s research. The research group of Bart De Strooper – Alzheimer’s researcher at VIB and KU Leuven – in collaboration with the group of Rudi D’Hooge – KU Leuven – and scientists at Janssen Pharmaceutica, Beerse, also tested this candidate drug in various Alzheimer’s animal test models. Their results were different, as were those of two American study groups. Therefore, they have recommended in a “technical comment” in Science that bexarotene should not be tested on patients.

Bart De Strooper (Department Director VIB/KU Leuven): “Science is a learning process and one learns by trial and error and by starting again and correcting mistakes. Therefore, it is logical that conclusions from scientific research – even in prestigious journals – need to be re-evaluated from time to time. If results cannot be reproduced, it is very important that this is mentioned so that other scientists can also determine the value of a publication (reproducible science is the only true science). This is the only way that we can learn from our mistakes and hopefully one day develop a drug.”

Jo Bury (Managing Director VIB): “VIB places great value on thorough checks and balances of scientific results. This is the most important condition for leading research that could benefit our society. It is good news that Science is also prepared to publish negative results.”

Scientific research, a process of ups and downs
Scientific findings do not simply fall into someone’s lap; they are the result of years of dogged research. The icing on the cake is a publication in a scientific journal, as this is the way that scientists announce their results to the world. Before a publication is accepted, a journal will submit the document to a panel of leading scientists in that field of research. The publication is only given the go-ahead following a positive evaluation by these experts.
Built-in control mechanisms
Is this an absolute guarantee? Unfortunately not.
Fellow scientists try to reproduce results. They are usually successful, but sometimes similar experiments lead to different results. And this needs to be reported and examined in more detail. These built-in control mechanisms in the scientific process are therefore very important. It is a normal part of the scientific process. Scientific journals also sometimes offer scientists the opportunity to comment on certain publications after they have been published. The journal Science does this in the form of “technical comments”. This is often the source of more extensive research.
New insights sometimes invalidate existing theories
Scientists want to get to the bottom of phenomena, usually with a certain hypothesis in mind. Research leads to new knowledge and insights, which results in refinement of the existing theories. However, sometimes this results in a completely new theory and the rejection of an existing theory. The history of science is littered with examples of this: think of Copernicus who was the first to assert that the sun – and not the earth – is the centre of our solar system. The Flemish contribution to Science is an excellent example of the self-monitoring process in the scientific world.
Relevant publication
"Technical comment on ApoE-Directed Therapeutics Rapidly Clear b-Amyloid and Reverse Deficits in AD Mouse Models”, Ina Tesseur et al., Science 2013

Kris Van der Beken | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.vib.be

Further reports about: Alzheimer Alzheimer’s drug Science TV VIB scientific research

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies
30.03.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht 'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine
30.03.2017 | University of Nebraska-Lincoln

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage

30.03.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>