Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

IN-TIME shows equal benefit of home telemonitoring in ICD and CRT-D patients

19.05.2014

ICD patients and CRT-D patients benefit to an almost equivalent extent from home telemonitoring

Home telemonitoring is equally effective in ICD and CRT-D patients, a subanalysis of the IN-TIME trial has shown. The findings were presented for the first time today at the Heart Failure Congress 2014, held 17-20 May in Athens, Greece. The Congress is the main annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

The prospective IN-TIME multicentre trial included 664 patients with chronic heart failure, class II or III New York Heart Association (NYHA) symptoms and left ventricular ejection fraction <35% who were receiving optimal medical therapy. Nearly two-thirds of patients (60%) received a cardiac resynchronisation defibrillator (CRT-D) while 40% received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD).

All of the implanted devices had a home telemonitoring capability. Patients were randomised in a 1:1 fashion to have the telemonitoring function switched on or off. For those patients who had the telemonitoring function switched on, data from their device was transmitted to a monitoring physician or clinic to enable early detection of arrhythmias or other complications. Patients with the telemonitoring switched off were followed up during visits to the clinic.

... more about:
»CRT-D »Cardiology »ICD »failure »mortality »receiving »risk »therapy

The findings of the overall study were presented at ESC Congress 2013. Briefly, the trial showed that telemonitoring reduced the proportion of patients with a worsened composite clinical score consisting of all cause mortality, overnight hospitalisation for worsened heart failure, change in NYHA class, and change in patient global self assessment from 27.2% to 18.9% (p=0.013) (primary outcome). Telemonitoring also reduced one-year mortality from 8.7% to 3.4% (p=0.004) (secondary outcome).

The current subanalysis of the IN-TIME trial, presented for the first time today, investigated whether home telemonitoring was equally effective in patients with a CRT-D and patients with an ICD.

Professor Gerhard Hindricks, principal investigator of the study, said: "We predefined this subanalysis because we wanted to know if our overall findings were the same in both device types. This would have an impact on the interpretation of the data and recommendations for treatment in these patient populations."

He continued: "The patient population receiving a CRT-D is quite different to the patient population receiving an ICD. Usually the patients with an indication for CRT implantation are at higher risk of worsening of heart failure during the natural course of the disease, and they profit more from defibrillator therapy with a cardiac resynchronisation function."

The researchers found that the relative risk of the primary outcome in the telemonitoring versus control group was similar in the ICD (0.61, p=0.06) and CRT-D (0.75, p=0.10) patients. The relative risk of the secondary outcome was also similar in both device groups (ICD: 0.38, p=0.15; CRT-D: 0.35, p=0.014).

Professor Hindricks said: "This subanalysis adds to the general finding of the IN-TIME trial. We now know that ICD patients and CRT-D patients benefit to an almost equivalent extent from home telemonitoring."

He concluded: "The take home message for clinicians is that if you have a patient with advanced heart failure and an ejection fraction less than 35% who is on optimal medical therapy, consider implantation of an ICD or CRT-D that is capable of home telemonitoring. Patients on both types of devices will benefit equally from home telemonitoring, with improved clinical outcomes including reduced mortality."

Jacqueline Partarrieu | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.escardio.org

Further reports about: CRT-D Cardiology ICD failure mortality receiving risk therapy

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brain
19.06.2018 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

nachricht Overdosing on Calcium
19.06.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

Im Focus: Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

A boost for graphene-based light detectors

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

How to track and trace a protein: Nanosensors monitor intracellular deliveries

19.06.2018 | Life Sciences

New material for splitting water

19.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>