Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

An important breakthrough in the fight against muscular dystrophies

13.09.2012
Recent findings by an international collaboration including IRCM researchers hold new implications for the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy
An important breakthrough could help in the fight against myotonic dystrophy. The discovery, recently published in the prestigious scientific journal Cell, results from an international collaboration between researchers at the IRCM, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the University of Southern California and Illumina. Their findings could lead to a better understanding of the causes of this disease.

Myotonic dystrophy (DM), also known as Steinert's disease, is the most common form of muscular dystrophies seen in adults. This disorder is characterized by muscle weakness and myotonia (difficulty in relaxing muscles following contraction). It is a multi-system disease, typically involving a wide range of tissues and muscle.

“We studied a specific family of proteins called muscleblind-like proteins (Mbnl), which were first discovered in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,” says Dr. Éric Lécuyer, Director of the RNA Biology research unit at the IRCM. “These RNA-binding proteins are known to play important functions in muscle and eye development, as well as in the pathogenesis of DM in humans.”

Because of the extreme heterogeneity of clinical symptoms, DM has been described as one of the most variable and complicated disorders known in medicine. The systems affected, the severity of symptoms, and the age of onset of those symptoms greatly vary between individuals, even within the same family.

“In patients with DM, levels of Mbnl proteins are depleted to different extents in various tissues,” explains Dr. Neal A.L. Cody, postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Lécuyer’s laboratory. “These alterations in levels and functions of Mbnl proteins are thought to play an important role in causing the disease.”

“The global transcriptome analyses conducted in this study yielded several insights into Mbnl function and established genomic resources for future functional, modeling, and clinical studies,” add Drs. Christopher B. Burge and Eric T. Wang from MIT, the researchers who headed the study. “This knowledge will be invaluable in reconstructing the order of events that occur during DM pathogenesis, and could lead to the development of diagnostic tools for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy.”

According to Muscular Dystrophy Canada, myotonic dystrophy is the most common form of muscle disease, affecting approximately one person in 8,000 worldwide. However, in Quebec’s region of Charlevoix / Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, the prevalence is exceptionally high, with one person in 500 affected by the disease. There is no cure for myotonic dystrophy at the present time. Treatment is symptomatic, meaning that problems associated with myotonic dystrophy are treated individually.
About the research project
This research project was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to Christopher B. Burge and by an NIH training grant and a Muscular Dystrophy Foundation fellowship to Eric T. Wang. Work conducted by Neal A.L. Cody in Dr. Lécuyer’s laboratory was funded by the Fonds de Recherche du Québec – Santé.

The article published in Cell, Transcriptome-wide Regulation of Pre-mRNA Splicing and mRNA Localization by Muscleblind Proteins, was prepared by Eric T. Wang, Thomas T. Wang, Daniel J. Treacy, David E. Housman and Christopher B. Burge from the David K. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Neal A.L. Cody and Éric Lécuyer from the IRCM; Sonali Jog, Michela Biancolella and Sita Reddy from the University of Southern California; and Shujun Luo and Gary P. Schroth from Illumina Inc.

For more information on this scientific breakthrough, please refer to the article summary published online by Cell: http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674(12)00885-9.

About Dr. Éric Lécuyer
Éric Lécuyer obtained his PhD in molecular biology from the Université de Montréal. He is an Assistant IRCM Research Professor and Director of the RNA Biology research unit. Dr. Lécuyer is assistant professor-researcher in the Department of Biochemistry at the Université de Montréal. He is also adjunct professor in the Department of Medicine (Division of Experimental Medicine) at McGill University. Dr. Lécuyer is a research scholar from the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé. For more information, visit www.ircm.qc.ca/lecuyer.

About the IRCM
Founded in 1967, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM) (www.ircm.qc.ca) is currently comprised of 37 research units in various fields, namely immunity and viral infections, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, cancer, neurobiology and development, systems biology and medicinal chemistry. It also houses three specialized research clinics, eight core facilities and three research platforms with state-of-the-art equipment. The IRCM employs 425 people and is an independent institution affiliated with the Université de Montréal. The IRCM clinic is associated to the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM). The IRCM also maintains a long-standing association with McGill University.

Download the news release as a PDF document
http://www.ircm.qc.ca/Medias/Communiques/Documents/20120912_IRCMRelease
_LecuyerCell.pdf
For more information and to schedule an interview with Dr. Lécuyer, please contact:
Julie Langelier
Communications Officer (IRCM)
julie.langelier@ircm.qc.ca
(514) 987-5555

Lucette Thériault
Communications Director (IRCM)
lucette.theriault@ircm.qc.ca
(514) 987-5535

Julie Langelier | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ircm.qc.ca

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Penn vet research identifies new target for taming Ebola
12.01.2017 | University of Pennsylvania

nachricht The strange double life of Dab2
10.01.2017 | University of Miami Miller School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

Im Focus: Bacterial Pac Man molecule snaps at sugar

Many pathogens use certain sugar compounds from their host to help conceal themselves against the immune system. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now, in cooperation with researchers at the University of York in the United Kingdom, analyzed the dynamics of a bacterial molecule that is involved in this process. They demonstrate that the protein grabs onto the sugar molecule with a Pac Man-like chewing motion and holds it until it can be used. Their results could help design therapeutics that could make the protein poorer at grabbing and holding and hence compromise the pathogen in the host. The study has now been published in “Biophysical Journal”.

The cells of the mouth, nose and intestinal mucosa produce large quantities of a chemical called sialic acid. Many bacteria possess a special transport system...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Water - as the underlying driver of the Earth’s carbon cycle

17.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

17.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Smart homes will “LISTEN” to your voice

17.01.2017 | Architecture and Construction

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>