Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hysterectomy is associated with increased levels of iron in the brain

05.10.2011
University of California Los Angeles study suggests reducing iron may lower age-related brain disease risk

The human body has a love-hate relationship with iron. Just the right amount is needed for proper cell function, yet too much is associated with brain diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

Science knows that men have more iron in their bodies and brains than women. These higher levels may be part of the explanation for why men develop these age-related neurodegenerative diseases at a younger age.

But why do women have less iron in their systems than men? One possible explanation for the gender difference is that during menstruation, iron is eliminated through the loss of blood.

Now, a new study by UCLA researchers confirms this suspicion and suggests strategies to reduce excess iron levels in both men and women. Dr. George Bartzokis, a professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and colleagues compared iron levels in women who had undergone a hysterectomy before menopause -- and thus, did not menstruate and lose iron -- with levels in postmenopausal women who had not had a premenopausal hysterectomy. They found the women who had undergone a hysterectomy had higher levels of iron in their brains than the women who hadn't, and further, they had levels that were comparable to men.

The research is reported in the current online edition of the journal Neurobiology of Aging.

The researchers used an MRI technique that can measure the amount of ferritin iron in the brain (ferritin is a protein that stores iron). They examined 39 postmenopausal women, 15 of whom had undergone a premenopausal hysterectomy. They looked at several areas in the brain three white-matter regions and and five gray-matter regions. Fifty-four male subjects were also imaged for comparison.

The researchers found that among the women, the 15 who had undergone a hysterectomy had concentrations of iron in the white-matter regions of the brain's frontal lobe that did not differ from the men's levels. Further, both the women who had a hysterectomy and the men had significantly higher amounts of iron than the women who had not undergone a hysterectomy. (Gray matter areas showed slight increases that were not statistically significant.)

Hysterectomy is the most common non-obstetrical surgery among women in the United States, with one in three having had a hysterectomy by age 60, said Bartzokis, who is also a member of the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging and the UCLA Brain Research Institute.

The results of this study, he said, suggest that menstruation-associated blood loss may explain gender differences in brain iron. And of interest to both men and women, he said, is that it's possible that brain iron can be influenced by peripheral iron levels -- that is, iron levels throughout the body -- and may thus be a modifiable risk factor for age-related degenerative diseases.

"Iron accumulates in our bodies as we age," Bartzokis said, "and in the brain contributes to the development of abnormal deposits of proteins associated with several prevalent neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Higher brain iron levels in men may be part of the explanation for why men develop these age-related neurodegenerative diseases at a younger age, compared to women."

Bartzokis suggests it may be possible to reduce age-related brain iron accumulations by reducing the levels of iron throughout the body. This may have health benefits, especially in men, and may help counteract the negative effects of aging on the brain by reducing the iron available to catalyze, or speed up, damaging free-radical reactions.

There are a few ways body stores of iron can be reduced naturally, especially for premenopausal women. Menstruation leads to the elimination of iron through loss of blood. During pregnancy, iron is transferred from the woman to the fetus, and when women breast-feed, iron is transferred to the baby through the mother's milk.

"But there are things postmenopausal women and especially men can do to reduce their iron levels through relatively simple actions," Bartzokis said. "These include not overloading themselves with over-the-counter supplements that contain iron, unless recommended by their doctor; eating less red meat, which contains high levels of iron; donating blood; and possibly taking natural iron-chelating substances, molecules that bind to and remove iron, such as curcumin or green tea, that may have positive health consequences."

Other study authors were Todd A. Tishler, Erika P. Raven, Po H. Lu and Lori L. Altshuler, all of UCLA. Funding was provided by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the RCS Alzheimer's Foundation.

Bartzokis has consulted for and received funding from Janssen Pharmaceutical Inc. and Novartis. Lori L. Altshuler received honoraria from Abbott Laboratories, Bristol-Meyers Squibb, Forest Laboratories and GlaxoSmithKline and is currently on an advisory board for Forest Laboratories; she has been on the speaker's bureaus for Forest Laboratories, GlaxoSmithKline, and AstraZenec. All other authors declare no conflicts of interest.

The UCLA Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences is the home within the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA for faculty who are experts in the origins and treatment of disorders of complex human behavior. The department is part of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, a world-leading interdisciplinary research and education institute devoted to the understanding of complex human behavior and the causes and consequences of neuropsychiatric disorders.

For more news, visit the UCLA Newsroom and follow us on Twitter.

Mark Wheeler | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ucla.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht One gene closer to regenerative therapy for muscular disorders
01.06.2017 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

nachricht The gut microbiota plays a key role in treatment with classic diabetes medication
01.06.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

Im Focus: Optoelectronic Inline Measurement – Accurate to the Nanometer

Germany counts high-precision manufacturing processes among its advantages as a location. It’s not just the aerospace and automotive industries that require almost waste-free, high-precision manufacturing to provide an efficient way of testing the shape and orientation tolerances of products. Since current inline measurement technology not yet provides the required accuracy, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is collaborating with four renowned industry partners in the INSPIRE project to develop inline sensors with a new accuracy class. Funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the project is scheduled to run until the end of 2019.

New Manufacturing Technologies for New Products

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new technique isolates neuronal activity during memory consolidation

22.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

A rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metal

22.06.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>