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Hypersensitivity to non-painful events may be part of pathology in fibromyalgia

15.09.2014

New research shows that patients with fibromyalgia have hypersensitivity to non-painful events based on images of the patients' brains, which show reduced activation in primary sensory regions and increased activation in sensory integration areas. Findings published in Arthritis & Rheumatology, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), suggest that brain abnormalities in response to non-painful sensory stimulation may cause the increased unpleasantness that patients experience in response to daily visual, auditory and tactile stimulation.

Fibromyalgia is a chronic, musculoskeletal syndrome characterized by widespread pain, affecting roughly two percent of the world population, say experts. According to the ACR, five million people in the U.S. have fibromyalgia, which is more prevalent among women. In previous studies fibromyalgia patients report reduced tolerance to normal sensory (auditory, visual, olfactory, and tactile) stimulation in addition to greater sensitivity to pain.

For the present study, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess brain response to sensory stimulation in 35 women with fibromyalgia and 25 healthy, age-matched controls. Patients had an average disease duration of 7 years and a mean age of 47.

According to the study, patients reported increased unpleasantness in response to multisensory stimulation in daily life activities. Furthermore, fMRI displayed reduced activation of both the primary and secondary visual and auditory areas of the brain, and increased activation in sensory integration regions. These brain abnormalities mediated the increased unpleasantness to visual, auditory and tactile stimulation that patients reported to experience in daily life.

Lead study author, Dr. Marina López-Solà from the Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Colorado Boulder said, "Our study provides new evidence that fibromyalgia patients display altered central processing in response to multisensory stimulation, which are linked to core fibromyalgia symptoms and may be part of the disease pathology. The finding of reduced cortical activation in the visual and auditory brain areas that were associated with patient pain complaints may offer novel targets for neurostimulation treatments in fibromyalgia patients."

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This study is published in Arthritis & Rheumatology. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full citation: "Altered Fmri Responses to Non-Painful Sensory Stimulation in Fibromyalgia Patients." Marina López-Solà, Jesus Pujol, Tor D. Wager, Alba Garcia-Fontanals, Laura Blanco-Hinojo, Susana Garcia-Blanco, Violant Poca-Dias, Ben J. Harrison, Oren Contreras-Rodríguez, Jordi Monfort, Ferran Garcia-Fructuoso and Joan Deus. Arthritis & Rheumatology; Published Online: September 15, 2014 (DOI: 10.1002/art.38781).

URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/art.38781

About the Author: To arrange an interview with Dr. López-Solà, please contact Laura Snider with the University of Colorado at laura.snider@colorado.edu.

Media Advisory
2014 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting Press

Registration Now Open.

What: Registration is now open to journalists planning to attend the 2014 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Boston.

Thousands of rheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals are expected to attend this year's meeting, which will highlight the latest advances in rheumatology research.

Where: Boston Convention Center; Boston, Mass.

When: November 15-19, 2014

Online Registration: To register for a press badge, please visit: http://www.acrannualmeeting.org/Press/

Policies: Please make sure to review our press guidelines http://www.acrannualmeeting.org/Press as they may impact your ability to receive press credentials

Important dates for this year's annual meeting:

  • Press registration closes: Monday, November 3
  • Press conference schedule announced: Early-October
  • On-site Newsroom opens: Saturday, November 15; 7:30 AM ET
  • Opening Lecture/Embargo lifts: Saturday, November 15; 4:30 PM ET

     

http://www.acrannualmeeting.org/Press or contact Bonny Senkbeil at (404) 633-3777 or via e-mail at bsenkbeil@rheumatology.org, 404-633-3777

About the Society

Headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., the American College of Rheumatology is an international professional medical society that represents more than 9,000 rheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals. Rheumatologists are internists or pediatricians who are qualified by training and experience in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles and bones. Over 50 million Americans — including nearly 300,000 children — suffer from the painful, disabling and sometimes fatal effects of arthritis and rheumatic diseases. The ACR's mission is to advance rheumatology. Learn more by visiting http://www.rheumatology.org. or follow ACR on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/acrheum.

About the Journal

Arthritis & Rheumatology is an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and covers all aspects of inflammatory disease. The American College of Rheumatology (http://www.rheumatology.org) is the professional organization whose members share a dedication to healing, preventing disability, and curing the more than 100 types of arthritis and related disabling and sometimes fatal disorders of the joints, muscles, and bones. Members include practicing physicians, research scientists, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, psychologists, and social workers. The journal is published by Wiley on behalf of the ACR. For more information, please visit http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/art.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global provider of content-enabled solutions that improve outcomes in research, education, and professional practice. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners.

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb), has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace. Wiley's global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com

Dawn Peters | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: ACR Arthritis Colorado Fibromyalgia Registration Rheumatology activation auditory diseases fMRI muscles pain sensory

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