Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

High dosage brachytherapy obtains excellent results in head and neck tumors

31.03.2009
High-dosage perioperative brachytherapy (applied within the surgical process) obtains excellent results in the treatment of head and neck tumours, at the same time as reducing the period of radiation.

These are the conclusions of research undertaken jointly by three Departments at the University of Navarra Hospital and which was published in the latest issue of Brachytherapy, official journal of the American Society of Brachytherapy.

The work describes the application of this new radiotherapy technique to 40 patients between 2000 and 2006. Given the size of the sample, the article is a description of the greatest number of patients treated with high-dosage brachytherapy for head and neck tumours in world medical literature. According to results, after a seven-year follow-up, the illness was controlled in 86% of the cases and the percentage of survival was 52%.

In concrete, the research focused on the treatment of tumours in the oral cavity, those affecting the tongue and the floor of the mouth, and those in the oropharyngeal region, such as tumours of the tonsils.

Involved in the study was a multidisciplinary team of seven specialists from three departments at the University of Navarra Hospital: the Radiotherapy Department, the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and the Ear, Nose and Throat Department.

Intensifying radiation dosage

As is known, brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment involving the placing of radioactive sources within the tumour or nearby.

In the case in hand, the work analysed the application of brachytherapy as complementary post-surgery treatment, explained Doctor Rafael Martínez-Monge, Director of the Radiotherapy Department. Some cases of head and neck tumours require the application of radiotherapy after the surgical operation. Using this technique, they have managed to intensify the radiation dosage with the goal of reducing relapse rates.

In certain treatments, brachytherapy provides better end-result possibilities than conventional radiotherapy. The procedure enables the administration of doses that would not be easily achieved using other techniques, due to toxic effects, explained the specialist from the University of Navarra Hospital.

Two weeks of treatment less

Moreover, the use in brachytherapy of high dosages involves a series of benefits for the patient as regards the overall treatment. The great advantage, points out Doctor Martínez-Monge, is the reduction of total time. While conventional radiotherapy treatment lasted seven weeks, administering part of the radiation through brachytherapy can take two weeks less.

This technique also manages to reduce the time of radiation compared to treatment with low dosage brachytherapy. Thanks to the existence of new sources of radiation, the treatment is released in a matter of minutes. Before the patient under brachytherapy treatment carried the radioactive source for several days and, thus, had to be isolated in a lead-lined room, with limitations on visits and nursing care. With high-dosage brachytherapy, however, the patient is only radioactive during the actual administration of the treatment; as such, the rest of the time can be spent in a conventional room.

For the administration of this technique it is necessary to prepare the affected region during the surgical operation. On extirpating the tumour, the surgeon covers the surgery zone — the area with greatest possibilities for relapse — with a series of plastic tubes which are subsequently filled with radioactive material, the aim being to effect a highly selective and precise radiation. Brachytherapy is introduced through these tubes, one end of which appears at the surface of the skin, like a drainpipe, explained Doctor Rafael Martínez-Monge. These tubes are connected to a machine that administers the treatment according to a computer programme personalised for each patient, he added.

Application to other types of tumour

Apart from perioperative high-dosage brachytherapy treatment for head and neck tumours, the University of Navarra Hospital has been working on the application of this procedure to other oncological processes for a number of years. There are a number of studies under way on its use in gynaecological tumours and sarcomas, amongst others. Since 2000 about 400 patients, with different types of tumours, have been treated with this technique.

Oihane Lakar | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.elhuyar.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Minimising risks of transplants
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht FAU researchers demonstrate that an oxygen sensor in the body reduces inflammation
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Decoding the structure of the huntingtin protein

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Camera technology in vehicles: Low-latency image data compression

22.02.2018 | Information Technology

Minimising risks of transplants

22.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>