Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Heart rate may predict survival and brain function in comatose cardiac arrest survivors

20.10.2014

Researchers may have developed a way to potentially assist prognostication in the first 24 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) when patients are still in a coma. Their findings are revealed today at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Dr Jakob Hartvig Thomsen from Copenhagen, Denmark.

Acute Cardiovascular Care is the annual meeting of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and takes place 18-20 October in Geneva, Switzerland.


This figure shows the 180-day mortality rate by experience of sinus bradycardia during therapeutic hypothermia.

Credit: Jakob Hartvig Thomsen

Dr Thomsen said: "When we talk to relatives and friends immediately after a cardiac arrest we often tell them that we're not able to say much about the prognosis for their Dad, Mom, friend, etc, for the next 3 to 4 days. This is incredibly distressing and loved ones are desperate for more information."

He added: "Therapeutic hypothermia is used in comatose survivors of OHCA to protect them from brain damage. Current recommendations say that prognostication should not be made until 72 hours after hypothermia when patients have returned to normothermia and the sedation has worn off.1 The prognostic tools presently available are not reliable until after this 72 hour period."

Dr Thomsen continued: "During hypothermia some patients lower their heart rate, which is called bradycardia. We hypothesised that this is a normal physiological reaction and that these patients may have less severe brain injury after their arrest and therefore lower mortality."

The study was conducted in the intensive care unit at Copenhagen University Hospital during 2004-2010 and was supported by the EU Interreg IV A programme. It included 234 comatose survivors of OHCA who underwent the hospital's standard 24 hour therapeutic hypothermia protocol. Heart rhythm was measured hourly and sinus bradycardia (defined as less than 50 heart beats per minute) was used to stratify the patients. The primary endpoint was 180 day mortality.

The investigators found that patients who experienced sinus bradycardia during therapeutic hypothermia had a 17% 180 day mortality rate compared to 38% in those with no sinus bradycardia (p<0.001) (figure 1), with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.38. Sinus bradycardia during therapeutic hypothermia remained an independent predictor of lower 180 day mortality with a HR of 0.51 after adjusting for known confounding factors including sex, age, comorbidity, witnessed arrest and bystander CPR.

Dr Thomsen said: "Patients with sinus bradycardia during therapeutic hypothermia had a 50-60% lower mortality rate at 180 days than those with no sinus bradycardia. We also found that sinus bradycardia was directly associated with a better neurological status 180 days after the arrest."

Few patients are in sinus bradycardia when they arrive at the intensive care unit (a period called the induction phase). However the proportion rises during hypothermia to almost 50%, and then declines during the rewarming phase.

Dr Thomsen said: "We speculated that this proportion of patients who develop sinus bradycardia during hypothermia would have better brain function and a lower mortality rate, and that was what we found. "

He added: "Now when we observe that a patient experiences sinus bradycardia below 50 beats per minute within the first 24 hours we can tell families that their relative may have a chance of recovery."

Dr Thomsen continued: "There is a lot of discussion about defining criteria to identify patients we should stop treating when a vegetative state is inevitable. We shouldn't give up on patients who still have a chance so this is an area in which we need to be very certain. Our findings provide an early marker of patients who may do well. Hopefully in the future, together with other tools, we will be able to differentiate between those with a very good or very poor prognosis so we can prioritise intensive care resources."

He concluded: "We are currently validating our findings by conducting the same analysis in the 950 patients included in the Targeted Temperature Management trial which was conducted in 36 intensive care units."

Jacqueline Partarrieu | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.escardio.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Improving memory with magnets
28.03.2017 | McGill University

nachricht Graphene-based neural probes probe brain activity in high resolution
28.03.2017 | Graphene Flagship

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Transport of molecular motors into cilia

28.03.2017 | Life Sciences

A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate drones

28.03.2017 | Information Technology

NASA spacecraft investigate clues in radiation belts

28.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>