Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Now hear this: Mouse study sheds light on hearing loss in older adults

10.11.2009
Becoming "hard of hearing" is a standard but unfortunate part of aging: A syndrome called age-related hearing loss affects about 40 percent of people over 65 in the United States, and will afflict an estimated 28 million Americans by 2030.

"Age-related hearing loss is a very common symptom of aging in humans, and also is universal among mammal species, and it's one of the earliest detectable sensory changes in aging," says Tomas Prolla, a professor of genetics and medical genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Prolla is senior author of a paper in today's (Nov. 9 ) PNAS that looks at the genetic roots of this type of hearing loss, which is not due to noise exposure.

The study has identified a gene that is essential to age-related hearing loss, a condition marked by deaths of sensory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons in the inner ear. These cells are at the heart of the conversion of vibrations into nerve impulses that the brain can decipher, and yet these cells cannot be regenerated.

In mice, the new study shows that the damage starts with free radicals, which are key suspects in many harmful changes of aging. Free radicals trigger a process called apoptosis, or programmed cell death, by which damaged cells "commit suicide." Apoptosis is often beneficial, as it eliminates cells that may be destined for cancer.

Before the study, it was already clear that "aging was associated with a major loss of hair cells and ganglion cells, so it was plausible that programmed cell death was playing a role in hearing loss," says Prolla. "We also thought that oxidative stress — the presence of free radicals — contributes to age-related hearing loss, so we put two and two together and showed that oxidative stress does indeed induce age-related hearing loss."

In mice, Prolla and the study's first author, Shinichi Someya, a postdoctoral researcher at UW-Madison, found that the suicide program was operating in hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, and that the suicide program relied on activity in a suicide gene called bak.

Activity of the bak gene "is required for the development of age-related hearing loss," says Someya. "The strongest evidence for this was the fact that a strain of mice that did not have the bak gene did not show the expected hearing loss at 15 months of age."

In one way, the new results are a bit unusual, Prolla admits. "In most genetic diseases, it's a mutation that causes the disease. In our study, a mutation in the gene prevents the disease."

Someya says he measured mouse hearing with an instrument like that used to test hearing in newborns. "It's a standard test for infants. We place electrodes on the skin above the brain, and when they respond to a sound an electric current is generated from the brainstem, and we detect that current."

The new results, obtained with collaboration from the universities of Florida, Washington and Tokyo, hint that the oxidative stress and hearing loss may be preventable. Although antioxidants have been widely used, with generally disappointing results, to prevent free-radical damage in aging, Someya and Prolla found that two oral antioxidants were effective. "One of the most surprising findings was that these two — alpha lipoic acid and coenzyme Q10 — were very specific in their protection against apoptosis and hearing loss," says Prolla.

Programmed cell death is triggered by mitochondria, small units inside cells that process energy for the cell. But when the mitochondria receive signals indicating that the cell is damaged, they break up and begin the process of apoptosis.

Confirming the importance of mitochondria in hearing loss, both of the helpful antioxidants are known to make mitochondria less responsive to oxidative stress.

The study provides strong evidence linking free radicals, the bak gene and hearing loss, Prolla says. "We wanted to know how oxidative stress leads to deaths of these critical cells, and when we looked at mice without bak, they were entirely protected from age-related hearing loss. One of our major findings is that free-radical damage does not kill the cell directly, but rather induces the pathway to programmed cell death. Mice without bak still accumulated oxidative damage, but did not undergo programmed cell death, did not lose hair cells or these neurons, and their hearing was fine."

Bak may play a role in other age-related conditions, Prolla adds. "This study focused on hearing loss, but there is evidence that other diseases associated with the loss of neurons, like Parkinson's or Alzheimer's, are associated with oxidative stress, and it's possible that the bak protein plays a role in apoptosis in those diseases as well. We are very intrigued by the possibility that blocking bak may have broader utility against neurodegeneration."

— Dave Tenenbaum, 608-265-8549, djtenenb@wisc.edu

Tomas Prolla | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wisc.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Vanishing capillaries
23.03.2017 | Technische Universität München

nachricht How prenatal maternal infections may affect genetic factors in Autism spectrum disorder
22.03.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Steep rise of the Bernese Alps

24.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

How cheetahs stay fit and healthy

24.03.2017 | Life Sciences

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>