Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Finicky Fat

Ever wonder why men and women gain weight in different areas of the body? Researchers are coming close to understanding the vital sex differences in men and women concerning fat storage. In fact, research indicates that fat is genetically different in men and women.

A groundbreaking medical study from members of the SWHR-Isis Fund Network on Sex Differences and Metabolism sponsored by the Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR), the nation’s leading advocate for the study of sex differences, uncovers new truths about fat deposition in male and female mice.

"Given the difference in gene expression profiles, a female fat tissue won't behave anything like a male fat tissue and vice versa," said Deborah Clegg, Ph.D., assistant professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center. "The notion that fat cells between males and females are alike is inconsistent with our findings."

Mice store their fat similar to humans in a sexually dimorphic pattern. Just like human males, male mice store their fat in the belly and midsection area while females store fat in their hips, thighs and buttocks. Fat around your central organs (also known as central adiposity) is the type that is most dangerous for subsequent development of chronic diseases.

Dr. Clegg, the senior author of the study appearing in the International Journal of Obesity, was surprised by the findings. “We found that out of about 40,000 mouse genes, only 138 are commonly found in both male and female fat cells,” said Dr. Clegg. “This was completely unexpected. We expected the exact opposite - that 138 would be different and the rest would be the same between the sexes.”

This news is especially helpful in determining the underlying causes of obesity-related diseases. Since men are more likely to carry extra weight around their bellies, they are at higher risk for numerous obesity-related diseases including diabetes and heart disease. Women, on the other hand, are usually protected from these disorders until menopause, when their ovarian hormone levels drop and fat storage tends to shift from their buttocks to their waists.

“The research being performed by Dr. Clegg and colleagues underscores the importance of understanding the differences in fat deposition in men and women,” said Viviana Simon, Ph.D., SWHR vice president of scientific affairs. “The ability to manipulate how and where in the body fat is deposited holds the promise of helping researchers develop strategies to prevent or delay the development of chronic conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.”

For more information on the Society for Women’s Health Research please contact Rachel Griffith at 202-496-5001 or

The Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR), a national non-profit organization based in Washington D.C., is widely recognized as the thought leader in women’s health research, particularly how sex differences impact health. SWHR’s mission is to improve the health of all women through advocacy, education and research. Visit SWHR’s website at for more information.

Rachel Griffith | Newswise Science News
Further information:

Further reports about: SWHR chronic condition chronic disease fat cells fat tissue health services

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease
26.10.2016 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>