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From energy booster to approved medical device

01.02.2010
Improved cardiac activity and stress regulation after 21-minute therapy

The Medical Plus device, manufactured by Airnergy AG, Hennef in Germany, has been approved as a medical device. The device is used to supplement respiratory air (spirovitalisation), a process that can increase the energy available to the body from inhaled air. The procedure is used in naturopathy and alongside other methods in conventional medicine. It can be used for preventive care and to support therapy for a broad range of conditions, including energy deficiency, burnout and sleep disorders.


For doctor and patient alike: Modest outlay – real benefit. Supplementing respiratory air offers major benefits for health and wellbeing. Photo: Airnergy, AG, Hennef, Germany

In spirovital therapy, air is energized using a patented method based on special light waves and catalysts and the user inhales this air for 21 minutes. The effect may be compared to inhaling a potentised concentration of woodland, mountain or sea air. As a result, it becomes easier for cells to utilise the oxygen in the air. Users will normally experience positive effects pretty quickly because improved oxygen utilisation promotes (mitochondrial) cell activity and communication, regulates metabolism and releases new vital energy.

Airnergy has commissioned a number of research studies. Initial results from these studies provide evidence of these reactions in the body. One was a study conducted by Prof. Kuno Hottenrott of Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg who observed inter alia an economising of cardiac activity in healthy test subjects. An increase in heart rate variability is linked to greater stress tolerance and more stable health. These effects, seen in sports students during the 21-minute Airnergy application, are probably even more marked in people suffering high stress levels at work or at home. In other words, the effect is probably even more pronounced in people exposed to stress.

“Airnergy’s focus on continuous research and development is exemplary,” said physical chemist Dr. Ronald Dehmlow from Berlin. “My view is that this promising principle deserves approval as a medical device. It means professional practitioners and patients can now be made aware of this practical, non-invasive therapy.” Nowadays there is more acceptance than ever before of such methods. The latest research shows that around 70 percent of the public would welcome complementary and alternative methods to mainstream medicine.

Dr. Stefan Brauweiler, a specialist in general practice and naturopathy based in Rheinbach, is one of a number of doctors already applying spirovital therapy for a range of physical and emotional stress indications, including migraine, muscle tension, chronic pain with connective tissue acidaemia, as well as following surgery. “We observe various effects in our patients ranging from deeper breathing through to muscle relaxation." The method clearly improves circulation too and also helps promote wound healing and regeneration,” reported the doctor from his practice. Another advantage is that it is something patients can do at any time either at home or at work and so promote their own health.

Caption: For doctor and patient alike: Modest outlay – real benefit. Supplementing respiratory air offers major benefits for health and wellbeing. Photo: Airnergy, AG, Hennef, Germany

Editior-in-chief: Guido Bierther
Tel: (+49) 2242 93 30-0
presse@airnergy.com

Guido Bierther | AIRNERGY AG
Further information:
http://www.airnergy.com

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