Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Looking for Creative Ways Online to Get Their Hands Washed

13.08.2009
Iowa State University's food safety Web site emphasizes information on hand washing documented in research-based findings.

Generations of admonitions haven’t always been able to get across the simple message: wash hands before dining. They’re not giving up at Iowa State University where the food safety Web site includes a section devoted to the topic.

The page with the theme of “Did You Wash ‘Em?” highlights one of many topics covered on the site at http://www.iowafoodsafety.org with the support of the Food Safety Consortium. As with all the information on the site, the hand-washing content is research based.

“This was targeted to multiple audiences, both consumers as well as retail food services,” said Catherine Strohbehn, an ISU Extension specialist in hotel, restaurant and institutional management who supervises the site.

ISU researchers published their findings on hand-washing habits in the Journal of Food Protection based on observed behaviors in different sectors of the retail food service industry: child care, assisted living, schools and restaurants.

“What we’re hoping to do with the Web page is synergize so that we’ve got different avenues to disseminate the information from the research and make it useful and relevant to practitioners,” Strohbehn said.

The hand-washing section of the site includes documents and presentations covering the myths about hand washing (one myth is that hot water is necessary, but it’s not; it’s the soap that makes the difference), illustrations showing the proper way to wash hands, a fact sheet about soiled hands and illness, the relationship between viruses and unclean hands, and even an audio version of a public service announcement featuring a high school choir singing a reminder to wash hands after playing with animals. A Yuck Photo Gallery (in English and Spanish) shows microbial growth after hands have touched soiled surfaces.

Food defense, a vital new area of concern for food processors, is also a key component on the site. It features links to several federal agency pages with information on procedures that plants must follow and that retail operations should know.

Strohbehn plans to continue looking for ways to improve the popular food safety lessons page that cover dangerous microorganisms, consumer control points (such as purchasing, storing, preparing, cooking, serving and handling leftovers) and finding the temperature danger zone for foods. The lessons are linked to online quizzes that test knowledge of the topics just covered.

“I’d like to get a better sense of who’s taking those quizzes – the demographics and the pass rate – to evaluate the effectiveness of those as a learning tool,” Strohbehn said. “We’ve learned from feedback that a lot of family consumer science education teachers are using those in their classroom.”

The site hosts a few video podcasts that demonstrate proper food safety procedures for food service operators to follow. They cover time and temperature issues, cleaning and sanitizing methods and health and hygiene problems. They’re informative industry-oriented productions of a few minutes each. However, they didn’t appear to attract the interest of the college students whom Strohbehn asked to review the videos.

“The bottom line was the students liked the convenience of the Web delivery of the video,” Strohbehn said. “The takeaway was it was boring because it wasn’t ‘edutainment.’ We need to be doing more ‘edutainment.’”

Dave Edmark | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.uark.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart
13.12.2017 | University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences

nachricht Routing gene therapy directly into the brain
07.12.2017 | Boston Children's Hospital

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gecko adhesion technology moves closer to industrial uses

13.12.2017 | Information Technology

Columbia engineers create artificial graphene in a nanofabricated semiconductor structure

13.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Research reveals how diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart

13.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>