Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Change in Breast Density Over Time Provides Clues About Breast Cancer Risk

21.04.2010
A decrease in breast density, or the proportion of fibroglandular tissue depicted on the mammogram image, over a number of years is associated with decreased risk of breast cancer, researchers from the Mayo Clinic campus in Minnesota report at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 101st Annual Meeting 2010.

The researchers found a 28 percent reduced risk of developing breast cancer in women whose breasts decreased in density, as seen from two different mammograms taken an average of six years apart, compared to women whose breast density did not change.

Two measures of breast density may, therefore, provide additional information for assessing breast cancer risk, says the study's lead investigator, Celine Vachon, Ph.D., an associate professor of epidemiology. Dr. Vachon adds, however, that this information is not ready for use in clinical practice to inform breast cancer risk. "Replication of these findings in other studies will be important," she says. "Also, improved and standardized measurements of breast density are needed for the assessment of changes in density."

The current assessment available in most clinical settings is BI-RADS, Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System, which is relatively unsophisticated when it comes to measuring breast density and was not intended for this purpose, Dr. Vachon says. "There is a lot of ongoing work aimed at improving measures of density, so that situation should change," she adds.

This study was drawn from the Mammography Health Study, which enrolled 19,924 women who were free of breast cancer, had screening mammograms performed at Mayo Clinic between 2003 and 2006 and resided in Minnesota, Iowa and Wisconsin. From this large group, the researchers selected participants who had at least one additional screening mammogram prior to enrollment, and then looked at clinic and tumor registries in the three Midwestern states to determine if any of these women developed breast cancer after enrolling in the study.

Measures of mammographic density were obtained from the two mammograms, an average of six years apart, for the approximately 1,900 women randomly sampled from the cohort, and from all 219 individuals who were diagnosed with breast cancer during follow-up. In the cancer-free group, 38.6 percent of women had a decrease in breast density, 50.4 percent stayed the same, and 11 percent showed an increase in breast density. In women who developed breast cancer, the percentages were 37, 51 and 12, respectively.

Women who developed breast cancer were less likely to experience a decrease in density in a second mammogram, says Dr. Vachon. After adjusting for other potential factors that contribute to breast cancer development, such as age, body mass index, postmenopausal hormones, postmenopausal status, in addition to baseline breast density, the researchers found that women who decreased one BI-RADS category or more over an average of six years were at 28 percent reduced risk of developing breast cancer, compared to women whose density was unchanged.

"We know that breast density can change with time, as evidenced by decreases seen with women going through menopause or using the breast cancer preventive drug tamoxifen and increases seen with postmenopausal hormone therapy use. Our results suggest that decreases in density may translate to decreased breast cancer risk," Dr. Vachon says.

The study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is the first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group practice in the world. Doctors from every medical specialty work together to care for patients, joined by common systems and a philosophy of "the needs of the patient come first." More than 3,700 physicians, scientists and researchers, and 50,100 allied health staff work at Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn; Jacksonville, Fla; and Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.; and community-based providers in more than 70 locations in southern Minnesota., western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa. These locations treat more than half a million people each year. To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. For information about research and education, visit www.mayo.edu. MayoClinic.com (www.mayoclinic.com) is available as a resource for your health stories.

Karl Oestreich | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mayo.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht 'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers
16.02.2018 | National University of Science and Technology MISIS

nachricht New process allows tailor-made malaria research
16.02.2018 | Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

Im Focus: Autonomous 3D scanner supports individual manufacturing processes

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time. The autonomous scanning system will be on display at the Hannover Messe Preview on February 6 and at the Hannover Messe proper from April 23 to 27, 2018 (Hall 6, Booth A30).

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fingerprints of quantum entanglement

16.02.2018 | Information Technology

'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers

16.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Hubble sees Neptune's mysterious shrinking storm

16.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>